Resource Center – The Arc Marion http://thearcmarion.org/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 05:10:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://thearcmarion.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-7.png Resource Center – The Arc Marion http://thearcmarion.org/ 32 32 Overcrowding at Hillsborough Pet Resource Center continues | New https://thearcmarion.org/overcrowding-at-hillsborough-pet-resource-center-continues-new/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 03:36:40 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/overcrowding-at-hillsborough-pet-resource-center-continues-new/ TAMPA — It’s common for populations to spike during the summer months at the Hillsborough County Pet Resource Center, but this year has been anything but standard. Despite the success of several adoption events, the shelter at 440 N. Falkenburg Road remains well beyond its capacity to keep its cats and dogs, said volunteer shelter […]]]>

TAMPA — It’s common for populations to spike during the summer months at the Hillsborough County Pet Resource Center, but this year has been anything but standard.

Despite the success of several adoption events, the shelter at 440 N. Falkenburg Road remains well beyond its capacity to keep its cats and dogs, said volunteer shelter coordinator Chelsea Waldeck. During a two-day event in late July, the shelter participated in the National Best Friends Adoption Weekend and placed more than 230 animals.

“It’s definitely contributed to a dent in our population,” said Waldeck, who is also a board member for the Hillsborough County Pet Resources Foundation, Inc. “Unfortunately, it has since filled in. Cats are starting down, which is good, but our dog population is starting to increase.

Speaking by phone Aug. 3, Waldeck said the Pet Resource Center houses about 266 dogs and 220 cats. This puts the shelter at around 150% capacity for dogs and around 390% for cats.

Overcrowding at the shelter also started happening before this summer, Waldeck said. Fewer animals entered during the COVID-19 pandemic, but this trend has reversed course.

“We’re definitely back to pre-COVID numbers now,” she said, adding that many animal neutering and neutering facilities have had to shut down or reduce operations, which could impact the numbers. current overpopulation.

The shelter continues to hold periodic special events and programs throughout the year to help reduce the number of people. On Saturday, August 6, the Find a Study Buddy adoption event focused on back-to-school activities and the shelter provided school supplies for children. As with most events, adoption fees have also been waived.

The Pet Resource Center also participates in the national Clear the Shelters campaign throughout August, including a special event on Aug. 27, Waldeck said.

Although most animals that end up at the shelter are brought in as strays, many are abandoned by owners who can no longer care for them. The Pet Retention Program helps combat these situations, whether owners cannot afford food or medical bills or have behavioral issues with the animal.

“If the animal ends up coming to our house, we’ll have to cover those costs anyway,” Waldeck said. “So we would much rather see what we can do to keep families together.”

The Pet Resource Center is the only open-admission shelter in Hillsborough County and its adoption hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Saturday. You can find more information about the Pet Resource Center by searching for it on the www.HillsboroughCounty.org website or by following the shelter on Facebook.

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Humboldt County is looking to buy two Eureka properties with a collective asking price of nearly $4 million | Lost Coast Outpost https://thearcmarion.org/humboldt-county-is-looking-to-buy-two-eureka-properties-with-a-collective-asking-price-of-nearly-4-million-lost-coast-outpost/ Mon, 08 Aug 2022 23:33:51 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/humboldt-county-is-looking-to-buy-two-eureka-properties-with-a-collective-asking-price-of-nearly-4-million-lost-coast-outpost/ Humboldt County is looking to purchase this two-story office building located at 1315 Fourth Street in Eureka. | Photos by Ryan Burns. ### The local real estate market has been hot latelyand Humboldt County wants to invest in property. At tomorrow’s Supervisory Board meeting, staff are seeking approval to negotiate terms for the […]]]>


Humboldt County is looking to purchase this two-story office building located at 1315 Fourth Street in Eureka. | Photos by Ryan Burns.

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The local real estate market has been hot latelyand Humboldt County wants to invest in property.

At tomorrow’s Supervisory Board meeting, staff are seeking approval to negotiate terms for the purchase of two Eureka office buildings, along with the land they sit on. While the purchase price is yet to be finalized — and deals could fall apart for a variety of reasons — the properties are listed for a combined price of $3,895,000.

The larger of the two, pictured above, houses a two-story, 8,760-square-foot office building whose architect apparently tried to hide its bland side by slamming a few incongruous faux-Greek columns into the front.

Formerly the headquarters of an accounting firm, the building is in “very good condition for the local market and would require relatively minimal work to be occupied by Humboldt County staff,” according to a staff report. This is listed for sale at $2.4 million.

Why does the county want this thing? Deputy County Administrator Sean Quincey said the specific future use remains to be seen, but there are a number of county buildings that need renovation or replacement, including the public defender’s office. at 1001 Fourth Street, the aging Clark Complex on Harris between H and I. streets (housing among other things the Planning and Building Department) and the Public Works Department, currently housed in trailers near the Adorni Center. This building could serve as a “rotating space” while renovation or redevelopment projects are underway.

Over the long term, the county is working to achieve a vision contained in its Facilities Master Plan – namely, to consolidate related services into a series of “campuses” for public convenience. Quincey said this Fourth Street property could play a role in that transition.



The county operates its Community Corrections Resource Center at this property, located at 404 H Street in Eureka.

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As for the other property, located at 404 H Street, the county already leases the one-story, 7,334-square-foot building, with the probation service using it to house its Community Correctional Resource Centerwhich is billed as a “one-stop shop” to meet the diverse needs of high-risk residents under county oversight.

Probation staff along with the Humboldt County Community Corrections Partnership (HCCCP) Executive Committee want the county to consider purchasing this property, now that it is on the market (listed at $1,495,000). A staff report states, “The potential to own a building that is currently leased would be an investment in county facilities for the greater public benefit.”

Maybe so, but does the county really have the money for such investments right now? Less than six weeks ago, as you may recall, the Board of Supervisors passed a hiring freeze because a backlog of overdue tax reports left directors with such glaring blind spots on the books that ‘they were unable to complete the annual budget.

Quincey emphasized that tomorrow’s agenda items do not lock the county into buying those properties. Instead, they would allow Public Works staff to negotiate the terms. Meanwhile, he said, Acting Auditor-Comptroller Cheryl Dillingham worked to complete the county’s overdue tax reports.

“We’re still cleaning up our books,” Quincey said. “Cheryl is doing a great job there, but at the same time we need to keep putting things in motion so that we can seize opportunities when we have more clarity.”

The county administrative office approved the use of funds from the 2020 financing plan, which Quincey described as a line of credit, for the purchase of 1315 Fourth Street.

The HCCCP, meanwhile, approved the Public Safety Realignment Trust’s expenditure of $20,000 for “preliminary investigations and negotiations” regarding the purchase of 404 H Street.

Both items are on the consent schedule for tomorrow, which means they must be approved without specific board deliberations.

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Efforts to help residents of Centennial Campground are muddied by the city’s refusal to call it a homeless response https://thearcmarion.org/efforts-to-help-residents-of-centennial-campground-are-muddied-by-the-citys-refusal-to-call-it-a-homeless-response/ Sun, 07 Aug 2022 13:21:24 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/efforts-to-help-residents-of-centennial-campground-are-muddied-by-the-citys-refusal-to-call-it-a-homeless-response/ Centennial Park Campground Thursday. (Anne Raup / DNA) Anchorage residents, social services and community groups have sprung into action to try to fill gaps in services at Centennial Park Campground, which were left after Mayor Dave Bronson’s administration closed the Sullivan Arena mass shelter in June and directed homeless residents to the park. . But […]]]>

Anchorage residents, social services and community groups have sprung into action to try to fill gaps in services at Centennial Park Campground, which were left after Mayor Dave Bronson’s administration closed the Sullivan Arena mass shelter in June and directed homeless residents to the park. .

But because the Bronson administration doesn’t treat the East Anchorage campsite as an official response to homelessness, there hasn’t been much coordination or a clear path for ad hoc groups trying to help the roughly 200 unsheltered residents of the campground.

Some say they were stymied and, in some cases, frustrated when they didn’t see the donations go immediately to campers, or when they turned away from serving hot food to campers.

And for many organizations providing services and outreach to unprotected Anchorage residents, the lack of a coordinated and official response to homelessness in Centennial has deterred them from sending staff to the campground for safety and liability reasons.

“It’s like a powder keg,” said Anchorage social worker Julia Terry. She voluntarily collected and distributed to Centennial residents about 100 kits containing Narcan, a life-saving opioid overdose reversal drug, and trained about 50 campers in its use. But Terry said she wouldn’t direct staff or colleagues to do outreach at Centennial.

“It’s about employee safety and the ability to be able to respond appropriately,” she said. “If we had a people support system in place, if people could engage with outreach teams like they could in other parts of our homeless response system, then I think that would be another matter.”

Centennial Campground

There are a few hundred people from all walks of life concentrated in an area with few resources. Some have a history of violence and others have been victims. Many campers have substance abuse disorders or untreated mental health issues, or both. With little or no supervision from trained social service personnel, it’s a dangerous situation, Terry said.

Bronson officials said the campground will likely remain a sanctioned camping area through September. In mid-July, the Salvation Army stepped in to help, on its own and without a contract with the city, to run the campground. Two Salvation Army social services staff are now on site Monday to Friday. They say they are doing their best to coordinate services, including food and donations. They are also working to find shelter or more permanent accommodation for the people there.

[No place to go: Anchorage’s homeless shelter capacity has been pushed to the brink]

“We are here to help customers, we try to coordinate efforts, but we are in no way the controlling body of this campground,” said Natalie Clendenin, spokeswoman for the Alaska Division of the Salvation Army.

Centennial Campground
Centennial Campground

Kendra Arciniega, a local filmmaker, organized efforts to make and deliver sandwiches, snacks and supplies to Centennial campers. She is angered by the Bronson administration’s refusal to have Centennial part of its response to homelessness and the conditions she witnessed at the campground, she said.

“If this isn’t an official municipal response, then why are you policing the community’s self-help efforts? Big question mark for me,” Arciniega said.

try to help

Duke Russell, an entertainer from Anchorage, regularly served hot homemade meals to campers until Monday, when city and Salvation Army staff said he could no longer bring food there, said he declared.

“When I started, there was no one around. There was absolutely no one around. No one cared. I went there 15 times before they arrested me,” said Russell.

Centennial Campground, Homeless

He prepared the fresh food in the morning and transported it to the campsite on the scooter. He served it hot at a campsite that served as a resource center and safe zone for campers, run by volunteer Roger Branson, chairman of the Houseless Resources Advocacy Council.

Bean’s Cafe, a local soup kitchen, is on hand to serve essential food, providing three meals a day, and coordinating food efforts with the Salvation Army.

Russell said he was there to provide an additional, healthy and often vegetable-based option for campers. He said it was a way to show unconditional support for people who are hurting, to serve food with love, compassion and dignity.

But once in the previous week, and again on Monday, a Salvation Army staff member and a city parks and recreation employee told Russell and Branson to stop serving food. They had concerns about food security, liability and concern for his own safety in the camp, Russell said.

In an email, the mayor’s office said there were no city rules prohibiting food sharing among Centennial campers and there were no requirements for community volunteer efforts, but that he asked that individuals and groups coordinate with the Salvation Army.

Clendenin said the concern is that, without coordination and oversight, Russell’s effort could potentially pose food safety issues for campers, such as serving contaminated food or inadvertently spreading disease. The Salvation Army asks people to be respectful and responsible, but not pushy, she said.

“We are not an executing agency, so if he chooses to cook, and for a large volume, at the campsite, it is his responsibility to ensure safety if he chooses not to coordinate with the Salvation Army or Bean’s,” Clendenin said. “We, ourselves, must follow the health department food safety laws. It’s an open campground and if people want to eat what he cooks, they can.

Another problem is that at times the donations, while well-meaning, have been less than helpful, Branson and Salvation Army staff said.

They received electronics, half-used toiletries and questionable food. That’s why the organization is asking community members to coordinate donations and other efforts with The Salvation Army, Clendenin said.

“What’s a homeless man going to do with a head of iceberg lettuce?” Branson said. “No way to wash it, make it into a salad, and nothing that goes with it.”

Russell returned Thursday morning to Centennial with an easel, canvas and paintbrushes. Rather than bringing food, he spent his time making paintings depicting the campground.

Centennial Campground

Volunteers administering Narcan

The Salvation Army currently needs volunteers who have a health care or social service background, but is considering taking volunteers over the age of 18 to help with its Centennial efforts, Clendenin said.

Capt. Denise Delgado, director of social services for the Salvation Army in Anchorage, is at Centennial on weekdays, gathering information from campers and entering it into Alaska’s homeless management information system. The system is a key step for visibility and connection to service agencies, and eventually – hopefully – finding placement in shelter or housing.

The process is slow, Delgado said. There are currently no low-barrier shelter spaces available in Anchorage, the rental market is scarce and expensive, and private shelters are largely full, with waiting lists.

Centennial Campground

[‘Deplorable,’ dangerous conditions at East Anchorage campground, homeless advocates say]

While the Salvation Army provides important services within its means, other informal volunteers have also found themselves in the position of providing urgent assistance, including life-saving emergency care.

One evening at the end of last month, Arciniega said that she and a group of volunteers walked from campsite to campsite, dropping off supplies and checking on people.

They administered Narcan twice during this trip, she said – once to a person they found passed out in a shower, who was later resuscitated, and again to a person they were found unconscious in a tent. That person was then taken by ambulance for emergency medical treatment, she said.

Volunteers found people sleeping in dirty bathrooms to protect themselves from the rain, she said. They found a broken and overflowing toilet with no toilet paper, she said.

When asked why it does not view the campground as an answer to the homeless, the mayor’s office said in a statement, “The Municipality of Anchorage is actively working with community partners to place people on a daily basis. in shelters, services, treatment and permanent accommodation. These efforts, which include setting up the Navigation Center later this year and providing other shelter/housing options, will continue as long as there is a need in our community.

[Police shooting rattles community at Anchorage’s campground for homeless residents]

Felix Rivera, Assemblyman and Chair of the Housing and Homelessness Committee, said the situation in Centennial won’t improve until the administration calls it an answer to homelessness and “will align the municipality’s efforts with reality”.

This would allow the Salvation Army or the Coalition to End Homelessness to coordinate on-site services, control perimeter, entry and exit, and implement structure, personnel and rules typically seen in low barrier shelters or sanctioned campgrounds that have existed. in other states, he said.

“Right now they’re treating it like a public campground and ignoring everything that’s going on there, ignoring all the needs that exist there that don’t exist in a normal public camp,” Rivera said. “Because the normal public campground is not an answer to government-created homelessness – and that’s exactly what happened here.”

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Flood Recovery Aid in Missouri and Illinois https://thearcmarion.org/flood-recovery-aid-in-missouri-and-illinois/ Fri, 05 Aug 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/flood-recovery-aid-in-missouri-and-illinois/ Flood recovery assistance centers have been marred by long lines and delays. ST. LOUIS – Flood assistance continues in Missouri, despite some issues affecting flood victims. Long lines marked the event in University City on Thursday. Wednesday in Florissant, the rain fell on the effort. If you need help with flood resources, there are several […]]]>

Flood recovery assistance centers have been marred by long lines and delays.

ST. LOUIS – Flood assistance continues in Missouri, despite some issues affecting flood victims.

Long lines marked the event in University City on Thursday. Wednesday in Florissant, the rain fell on the effort.

If you need help with flood resources, there are several more events coming up this weekend.

Organizers say you just need to bring ID and proof of address, such as a bill or bank statement, to flood recovery centers.

“We have two events in St. Louis that anyone can attend, but you don’t have to live in the city to attend. We have two in East St. Louis that will also be over the weekend,” said Sharon Watson of the American Red Cross. “We encourage Illinois residents to attend Illinois events as state officials will also be in attendance.

Friday – Another flood resource center will open in St. Louis at Friendly Temple Church, located at 5553 Dr. Martin Luther King Drive. It starts at 3:30 p.m.

Friday – For flood victims who need food, cleaning supplies and personal care items or pet food, the St. Louis Area Foodbank is hosting an event at Jackson Park Elementary School at University City. This drive-in event takes place from 3-8 p.m. and no RSVP is necessary.

Saturday – The Friendly Temple Church Flood Resource Center will reopen for those in need of assistance. The Saturday center will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

  • Flood recovery centers will be open at East St. Louis High School on Saturday beginning at 9:00 a.m. and Sunday beginning at noon.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=videoseries

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Charlie Curtis is the new director of the LGBT Resource Center – St. Cloud State TODAY https://thearcmarion.org/charlie-curtis-is-the-new-director-of-the-lgbt-resource-center-st-cloud-state-today/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 20:59:07 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/charlie-curtis-is-the-new-director-of-the-lgbt-resource-center-st-cloud-state-today/ Freshman counselors take their photos in the studio on the Utah Valley University campus in Orem, Utah on Thursday, July 1, 2021. (Erik Flores, UVU Marketing) Charlie Curtis is the new director of the LGBT Resource Center in the Division of Student Life and Development at St. Cloud […]]]>





Freshman counselors take their photos in the studio on the Utah Valley University campus in Orem, Utah on Thursday, July 1, 2021. (Erik Flores, UVU Marketing)

Charlie Curtis is the new director of the LGBT Resource Center in the Division of Student Life and Development at St. Cloud State University beginning July 27.

Charlie holds an M.Sc. from the University of California, Irvine and a BA from Bowdoin College, both in anthropology. Their graduate research examined various interpretations of safety among queer and trans communities in Iowa.

Charlie is an educator, anthropologist, and LGBTQ+ advocate committed to justice and equity frameworks that center systemic change to address the traumatic histories and contemporary needs of oppressed communities.

Prior to accepting the position at St. Cloud State, they worked as an academic advisor for freshmen at Utah Valley University in Orem, Utah.

If you would like to reach out and welcome Husky, you can email Charlie at: charlie.curtis@stcloudstate.edu.




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As Buffalo center reopens, congresswoman takes action to protect pro-life groups https://thearcmarion.org/as-buffalo-center-reopens-congresswoman-takes-action-to-protect-pro-life-groups/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 00:12:55 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/as-buffalo-center-reopens-congresswoman-takes-action-to-protect-pro-life-groups/ As a burnt-out pregnancy center reopened near Buffalo, New York, on Monday, leaders vowed to continue their work and criticized authorities for a slow investigation and even appearing to condone the attack. Congresswoman Claudia Tenney (RN.Y.) told the crowd that she introduced the Pregnancy Resource Center Defense Act to increase jail terms and fines for […]]]>

As a burnt-out pregnancy center reopened near Buffalo, New York, on Monday, leaders vowed to continue their work and criticized authorities for a slow investigation and even appearing to condone the attack.

Congresswoman Claudia Tenney (RN.Y.) told the crowd that she introduced the Pregnancy Resource Center Defense Act to increase jail terms and fines for attacks on anti-pregnancy centers. -abortion such as CompassCare pregnancy services.

The fire that damaged the center began around 2:30 a.m. on June 7. Police have yet to announce the cause as arson or arrest anyone.

Center director Reverend Jim Harden said their security cameras captured video of multiple attackers with multiple incendiary devices, likely Molotov cocktails. Police have confiscated the security camera footage and the center cannot access it, Harden said.

Epoch Times Photo Epoch Times Photo Epoch Times Photo

Epoch Times Photo

Epoch Times Photo
Damage to CompassCare Pregnancy Center in Amherst, NY Its windows were smashed and fires started inside early June 7, 2022. Spray-painted on one wall was the message “Jane was there.” A pro-abortion group called Jane’s Revenge took credit for the attack. (Dan Berger/The Epoch Times)

Graffiti “Jane was here” was scrawled on the side of the building, and a pro-abortion group called Jane’s Revenge took credit for the subsequent firebombing. It was one of many such attacks on these centres, which offer advice, care and support to pregnant women to persuade them to keep their babies.

Tenney, Harden and New York State Senator George Borrello expressed contempt for the state’s official response to the incident, which Harden said caused $250,000 in damages and $150,000 additional in increased security costs.

Governor Kathy Hochul, they said, responded to the incident by moving to investigate, not Jane’s Revenge, but the centers themselves. She called pro-lifers “Neanderthals” less than two weeks after the attack. State Attorney General Letitia James has asked Google to remove pregnancy centers from their maps, Harden said.

60 similar incidents

Nearly 60 pregnancy centers and anti-abortion churches have been attacked nationwide in recent months, according to the Boston Globe, including attacks in Longmont, Colorado; Anchorage, Alaska; Portland, Oregon; and Madison, Wisconsin.

At the Longmont clinic, the attackers scrawled “if abortions aren’t safe, neither are you” on the walls of the building they burned down. The violence began after the impending Dobbs Supreme Court decision reversing Roe v. Wade.

The City of Amherst Police Department, where the CompassCare Pregnancy Services Center is located, declined to attend the reopening event and released a brief statement saying it was continuing to investigate in conjunction with the FBI. and other agencies. Efforts to reach the City of Amherst Police Department and the local FBI office in Buffalo for comment were unsuccessful.

The agencies have released virtually no information about their investigation, Harden said. “We are very frustrated with the time this is taking. It’s day 55. It’s inexcusable.

“It’s pro-abortion Kristallnacht,” he said. He defended his bold comparison of this wave of violence to that unleashed against German Jews by the Nazis in November 1938. Common to both events, he said, was the lack of public outcry and the denial of political leaders to criminalize it and go after the perpetrators.

“They turned around and said you deserved it… They sent a message that violence is okay if it supports their political agenda,” said State Sen. George Borrello, the only state lawmaker to attend the event today. “It’s worse than silence.

“Jane’s Revenge is emboldened by the inaction of our Governor, our Attorney General and our majority Democratic Legislature.”

The state’s controversial bail reform law means the perpetrators, if caught, will likely be released without bail. “Somebody has to die before progressives think it’s violence,” Borrello said.

mother or baby

Tension around abortion began to rise in the state long before the recent Dobbs ruling. Former Governor Andrew Cuomo pushed through a bill in 2019 making abortion a basic human right, Harden said. This means that under New York law, any doctor who refuses to refer a woman for an abortion is violating the pregnant woman’s civil rights.

CompassCare opened its Buffalo-area center in 2019. It saw about 1,100 patients last year and expects to see 1,600 this year. The attack did not stop their work. They saw patients right after the attack at their Rochester-area clinic and quickly found an undisclosed location in the Buffalo area where they could resume their visits.

A woman first gets several answers to her medical questions, Harden said. She wants to confirm that she is pregnant, find out how far along she is if she is, and find out if she has a sexually transmitted disease that can complicate an abortion. They are seen by paid nurses, who are supervised by volunteer doctors.

CompassCares also connects them with agencies willing to work with women during and after pregnancy, with support, financial assistance, connection to adoption agencies and other help.

A woman having an abortion because of all the pressure she feels — from family, boyfriend, work, financial pressures or abortion providers — is ultimately an act of coercion, Harden said.

“Everything hits her like a wave. There is an instinctive reaction “I have to get out of this”. She needs to get to the point where she can breathe and think about what she’s really up against. We can help him overcome these obstacles.

“We believe that everyone is made in the image of God and worthy of protection, both mother and child. If you really believe in it, it takes a lot of work to sustain it. The church is ready to do the work, pay for it, walk with it, and become friends with it.

This isn’t the first time a significant act of abortion-related violence has occurred in Amherst, an affluent suburb outside of Buffalo. Dr. Barnett Slepian, one of three doctors who performed abortions in the area, was murdered by a sniper in 1998.

The killer, hiding in the woods behind Slepian’s Amherst home, shot him through the kitchen window on a Friday night after the doctor returned from his synagogue. The shooter, James Kopp, was placed on the FBI’s ten most wanted list, arrested in France in 2001 and extradited. He is currently serving life in prison without the possibility of parole for second degree murder. The federal government has waived the death penalty as a condition of extradition.

After the murder, anti-abortion violence receded and temperatures cooled as the government and activists on both sides established rules to allow clinics to operate, medical professionals to go to work and protesters to manifest.

Dan M. Berger

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The ‘hard-to-grasp truth behind abortion’ revealed – L’Observateur https://thearcmarion.org/the-hard-to-grasp-truth-behind-abortion-revealed-lobservateur/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 11:32:54 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/the-hard-to-grasp-truth-behind-abortion-revealed-lobservateur/ by John Grimaldi WASHINGTON, DC — Rebecca Weber, CEO of the Association of Mature American Citizens [AMAC], opened a timely new episode of his Better for America podcast by emphasizing that the most important issue of our time is not abortion, but life. His guest, filmmaker Tracy Robinsonrecently released his latest production, “The Matter of […]]]>

by John Grimaldi

WASHINGTON, DC — Rebecca Weber, CEO of the Association of Mature American Citizens [AMAC], opened a timely new episode of his Better for America podcast by emphasizing that the most important issue of our time is not abortion, but life. His guest, filmmaker Tracy Robinsonrecently released his latest production, “The Matter of Life”, which focuses on “the life, conscience and the sometimes elusive truth behind abortion”.

Robinson says she started working on the film about six years ago – long before the Roe v. Wade, 50, from being overturned by a new Supreme Court. The movie was released almost a month before that happened.

“Even as an evangelical Christian, I didn’t really care about the issue of abortion. I didn’t think that was a big deal in the grand scheme of things. As a producer, she was commissioned to make videos for the Pregnancy Resource Center. “The information I heard, the logic, the clarity, the science of embryology, learning about it, being able to look at fetal imagery and abortion consequence imagery and really being confronted with reality with what abortion really is and what it really does. And that’s when I like to say that I was uploaded with this vision that it should be a documentary film because that I knew there were so many millennials and younger in my skin who had never heard this information before, who had never been offered the pro- the persuasion of life or the base case pro- And if they’re like me, they went to public school, they grew up in church, but their parents never really broached the subject, or their pastors never broached the subject.

That’s what “The matter of life” is all about. “People just need to be invited to think more deeply about this question,” she said. Roe v Wade is “a huge step. And I was just very happy and excited to be alive at a time when that reversed… But the job is not done. The fact that all these blue states are becoming sanctuaries, so to speak, for abortions [and that] women are flown free to states like California, where I live, flown, lodged in hotels and aborted for free. And so, she says, “we shouldn’t just settle for the fact that it’s now up to states to choose and decide that there is no right to kill an innocent human being. The work is not done. The battle is still ongoing. »

Robinson pointed out that Planned Parenthood and abortion lobbyists like NARAL Pro-Choice America continue to promote abortion and seek to convince us that abortion is just a method of birth control. She points out that the proof is in the growing number of women who have multiple abortions. “We teach young people that this is a normal option for them. Abortion is a huge lucrative industry. There is a lot of money to be made. And so, no wonder he’s so protected that Planned Parenthood and the abortion industry [continue] fight for abortion. And now they’re doing it through abortion pills and they’re sending women home with these pills to basically have miscarriages on their own. And it is very dangerous. So there are all kinds of money for abortion. And that’s really what it boils down to, it’s the love of money.

Annie Tang Humphrey, chief operating officer of pro-life organization Save the Storks, which empowers women to choose life, saw Robinson’s film ‘The Matter of Life’ and admitted that it “pushed me to coping with the pain of my abortion experience 25 years ago. I mustered the courage to speak out about it publicly. By educating others, I experienced true healing and empowered other women .

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Community resource center spreads love, kindness and free services https://thearcmarion.org/community-resource-center-spreads-love-kindness-and-free-services/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 20:03:15 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/community-resource-center-spreads-love-kindness-and-free-services/ A local nonprofit has become a catalyst for positive change in a Columbus community. It’s a place where people are treated like royalty and services are free. You may have seen it. Commuters passing through the neighborhood known as East Highland in Columbus can’t help but notice the flurry of activity in the white brick […]]]>

A local nonprofit has become a catalyst for positive change in a Columbus community.

It’s a place where people are treated like royalty and services are free. You may have seen it. Commuters passing through the neighborhood known as East Highland in Columbus can’t help but notice the flurry of activity in the white brick building at the corner of 13th Avenue and 18th Street. Or maybe they’re grabbing a whiff of what’s on the grill. It’s called the Love and Kindness Community Resource Center, a non-profit Christian organization founded in April 2019.

“We provide clothes, shoes, toiletries, we provide groceries. We try to help people where we can with what we have,” said Renae Dickerson of the Love and Kindness Community Resource Center.

For Renae Dickerson, it’s a mission from God. It all started when she saw a need in children for clothes.

“I was praying about it and the Father just told me to start collecting clothes and I did. We were getting together, my husband and I were collecting clothes for four months.

Now there are pieces overflowing with shoes, menswear and womenswear. When the pandemic hit, Dickerson says they were overwhelmed with people who needed almost everything.

“Just simple things. Deodorant, a pair of used shoes. A coat.”

Dickerson says she is grateful to have earned the trust of the community. On Monday nights, the parking lot is full for Faith, Food and Fellowship, a revival, where anyone can stop to pray or share their story like Ronnie Price who spent 28 years behind bars on drugs. Then he met a man named Jesus.

“You don’t have to be a drug addict your whole life. God can take that away from you. Now I can go back to those streets and those trenches and help get some of those people out,” said Ronnie Price, former addict.

A grassroots movement energized by this glimmer of hope in a community that Dickerson said was ready for change.

“They are driven by drugs. They are attracted to different spirits that seem to overtake them and they wanted help.

But here they get much more. Love, kindness and hope.

“We consider it a blessing and a joy to serve the people of God and they are people of God whom you know not to mistreat.”

All services are free. If you need school clothes for your children, you can call 706-580-8534 to schedule an appointment.

Here is a link to the Love and Kindness Community Resource Center Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Love-and-Kindness-Community-Resource-Center-106633178795363/

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Sacred Rest Drop-In Center temporarily closed until the end of July https://thearcmarion.org/sacred-rest-drop-in-center-temporarily-closed-until-the-end-of-july/ Thu, 28 Jul 2022 04:17:30 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/sacred-rest-drop-in-center-temporarily-closed-until-the-end-of-july/ Although Berkeley’s Sacred Rest Drop-In Center for the Homeless is temporarily closed to accommodate summer camp, Village of Love Executive Director and Founder Joey Harrison has found other ways to serve the community. without city housing. The welcome center, which opened in June, has been in the works for some time, according to UC Berkeley […]]]>

Although Berkeley’s Sacred Rest Drop-In Center for the Homeless is temporarily closed to accommodate summer camp, Village of Love Executive Director and Founder Joey Harrison has found other ways to serve the community. without city housing.

The welcome center, which opened in June, has been in the works for some time, according to UC Berkeley spokesman Dan Mogulof. The center is a collaboration between the city, campus and its homeless outreach coordinator Ari Neulight and the Village of Love.

“Architect Sam Davis, an Emeritus Faculty Member with extensive experience in designing affordable housing and facilities for the homeless, developed the initial design for the Welcome Center in consultation with the leadership of the church, city and university project members, and a nonprofit service provider that operates a similar drop-in center,” Mogulof said in an email.

The campus paid for site preparation and site construction at First Presbyterian Church in Berkeley, Mogulof said. However, he added that the city and the university share the cost of a two-year grant to the Village of Love for the management and operation of the center.

According to Mogulof, the idea for the drop-in center grew out of a Goldman School of Public Policy study that interviewed homeless community members in People’s Park about what could improve their situation.

“A large number of respondents noted that a safe place to rest and connect to services during the day was badly needed,” Mogulof said in the email. “The report recommended the establishment of a church and community-run drop-in center where homeless community members could rest, use the toilet, clean themselves, eat a meal and meet with providers.”

Currently, according to Peter Radu, assistant to the Berkeley city manager, the center provides services such as meals, mental health counselling, employment and housing support, access to benefits and showers, among others. . He regularly serves about 10 people a day, Harrison said, though he’s served as many as 25 to 30 in a single day.

Harrison and his team, who have operated the center since June, have long been preparing for the center to close from July 18 to August 1, Harrison said. According to their rental agreement, the church uses the center space for their two-week summer camp.

With that in mind, Harrison said his team is working to connect with community partners to ensure that visitors to the welcome center are properly cared for while it is closed.

Mogulof added that center guests were specifically directed to Bay Area Community Services and the Dorothy Day House Visitor Center and given a phone number to call if they needed additional services. Radu noted that the Berkeley Community Resource Center and the Berkeley Drop-In Center could also provide services for homeless people.

“The team is still there doing outreach, handing out hygiene kits, meeting with the community,” Harrison said. “(Instead of being) in one place now, they’re sort of mobile around the area.”

Clients normally served at the center can also receive showering and laundry services on Fridays, Harrison noted. Such provisions remain necessary for members of the homeless community, especially since the People’s Park bathroom was sealed in early July, as first reported by Berkeleyside.

Harrison himself has a long history of serving the homeless community, from conducting trainings on de-escalation and preventing the criminalization of homelessness to creating an outreach program for homeless people in the Temescal region.

Harrison said it was his own experiences that led him to develop a homelessness program through Village of Love, which now has several locations in the East Bay.

“I was homeless and I went through that, I was the clients we’re helping now eight years ago,” Harrison said. “It’s really community-based, I’m very committed to building community – bridging the gap between the housed and the unhoused.”

The city, campus and church, Harrison said, have so far been “brilliant” and “very supportive” throughout the process of running the center.

Going forward, Harrison hopes to continue fostering relationships with members of the Berkeley community.

“We’re going there and will continue to build our relationships with our community partners as well as our guests,” Harrison said.

Contact Sébastien Cahill at [email protected]and follow him on Twitter at @SebastianCahill1.

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Patterson featured in East Meets West series https://thearcmarion.org/patterson-featured-in-east-meets-west-series/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 02:06:08 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/patterson-featured-in-east-meets-west-series/ Dr. Patrick Patterson is Professor of History at Honolulu Community College and Adjunct Professor of Asian Studies at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa, where he specializes in popular East Asian culture and history. . A college professor will discuss how popular music has helped shape cross-cultural relations between Asians and Westerners, including Japan and […]]]>

Dr. Patrick Patterson is Professor of History at Honolulu Community College and Adjunct Professor of Asian Studies at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa, where he specializes in popular East Asian culture and history. .

A college professor will discuss how popular music has helped shape cross-cultural relations between Asians and Westerners, including Japan and Hawaii.

Asian Studies professor Patrick Patterson is the guest speaker for an “East Meets West” series on Saturday, July 30 at 1:30 p.m. at the Stanley Izumigawa Resource Center at the Nisei Veterans Memorial Center in Wailuku.

The event is free and open to the public, but due to social distancing requirements, reservations are required. To register, call NVMC at 808-244-6862 or visit the website at www.nvmc.org.

Japan and Hawaii share a dynamic history shaped by immigration, culture and trade. The “East Meets West” series examines the similarities and differences between the cultures of Japan and Hawaii by inviting professionals from various fields to share their knowledge.

Patterson is Professor of History at Honolulu Community College and Adjunct Professor of Asian Studies at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa, where he specializes in popular East Asian culture and history.

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In 2018 he published “Music and Words: Producing Popular Songs in Japan, 1887-1952”, a book about the establishment of Japan’s recording industry and its first major pop songwriter, Nakayama Shimpei.

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Professor Patterson is currently working on projects on transnational celebrities in Asia from 1920 to 1947 and on the relationship of journalism and storytelling to culture in Japanese newspapers between 1868 and 1926.

After meeting and speaking with contemporary singers and musicians from K-Pop, J-Pop and Enka, Patterson investigates the phenomenon of “City Pop” in an effort to understand the relevance of older music to younger generations.

In his keynote, Patterson will introduce “Border Song: How Popular Song Shaped Cross Cultural Identity in the 20th Century.” Patterson will explore the lives and songs of Yamaguchi Yoshiko, Hibari Misora ​​and Hattori Ryoichi – three popular people with gripping stories.


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For a weekly list of Maui music and other events, go to Maui Entertainment, Arts, Community, July 21-27 and click here.

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