Resource Center – The Arc Marion http://thearcmarion.org/ Fri, 22 Oct 2021 04:24:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://thearcmarion.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-7.png Resource Center – The Arc Marion http://thearcmarion.org/ 32 32 Santa Clara County Back-to-School Resource Center Unveils New “We Deserve It” Mural https://thearcmarion.org/santa-clara-county-back-to-school-resource-center-unveils-new-we-deserve-it-mural/ Fri, 22 Oct 2021 00:22:16 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/santa-clara-county-back-to-school-resource-center-unveils-new-we-deserve-it-mural/ SAN JOSE, Calif. (KRON) – On its 10th anniversary, the Santa Clara County Reentry Resource Center (RRC) unveiled a new mural on Thursday. “Having a mural like this is an important first impression of our center, it helps set the tone for our clients’ state of mind as they enter unfamiliar spaces like this,” Javier […]]]>

SAN JOSE, Calif. (KRON) – On its 10th anniversary, the Santa Clara County Reentry Resource Center (RRC) unveiled a new mural on Thursday.

“Having a mural like this is an important first impression of our center, it helps set the tone for our clients’ state of mind as they enter unfamiliar spaces like this,” Javier said. Aguirre, director of the Santa Clara County Re-entry Services office. .

“For reintegration clients it is difficult to come here, many do not have transport, they may have to walk for a long time, many are hungry, cold, barefoot, homeless, scared and desperate,” Aguirre added. .

“Having works of art like this sends the message that we are here to help, we are confident in their abilities and we will work together to meet their needs. “

The new mural is a gift from the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) which was created by Briena Brown, graduate in sociology and studio art from SJSU, and artist Urna Bajracharya, student in Design Media Arts at UCLA.

“The process of creating this mural was to create something bright and beautiful, which was at the forefront of our minds when we designed it,” Bajracharya said.

“We want this to be a very positive experience for visitors, so that’s what we hope for the future of the mural, that it provides a space for positivity and growth.”

Brown and Bajracharya told KRON4 News the mural began over a year ago when they met at a protest against George Floyd.

The title of the new fresco is “We, the Deserving”.

“Personally, I’ve never experienced what it’s like to go through the prison system, but I think it’s important to realize that it’s not enough to be compassionate anymore, you can feel empathy. , but actually wanting to do something about it is something that can be done without experiencing it, ”Brown said.

“And I think I hope this attitude spreads throughout the county and is able to solve the fundamental problem of so many black and brown people in prison.”

The NAACP-funded artwork celebrates the Reentry Resource Center’s decade of helping some of the county’s most vulnerable residents reintegrate into their communities with the tools they need to achieve their goals.

The RRC opened in 2012 with the aim of providing resources to those formerly incarcerated and helping them to successfully reintegrate into the community.

Under one roof, a range of organizations and departments collaborate and work together to provide referrals for mental health and addiction treatment, public benefit registration, counseling, healthcare, education, write-off services, employment references, and accommodation and shelter information for DRR clients.

“Those of you who were with us 10 years ago will recall that the amount the county was going to allocate was unknown until the final budget and the start date of the realignment was also unknown,” said Miguel. Marquez, Chief Operating Officer of Santa Clara County.

“They gave us three whole months to prepare, it was a sprint, but since then we have hit our stride over the past 10 years and we are still running harder than ever.”


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Maricopa County Law Library Resource Center Helps Victims of Domestic Violence https://thearcmarion.org/maricopa-county-law-library-resource-center-helps-victims-of-domestic-violence/ Wed, 20 Oct 2021 22:12:43 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/maricopa-county-law-library-resource-center-helps-victims-of-domestic-violence/ item PHOENIX – October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month and the Arizona Judicial Branch in Maricopa County assists victims through its four Law Library Resource Centers. “Through its four Law Library Resource Centers in Maricopa County and in partnership with AZPOINT (Arizona Protective Order Initiation and Notification Tool), the judiciary helps residents of Maricopa County […]]]>

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month and the Arizona Judicial Branch in Maricopa County assists victims through its four Law Library Resource Centers.

“Through its four Law Library Resource Centers in Maricopa County and in partnership with AZPOINT (Arizona Protective Order Initiation and Notification Tool), the judiciary helps residents of Maricopa County understand and navigate the process. of obtaining protection orders to fight against domestic violence or harassment, “said Vincent Funari, head of public information.

“The Law Library’s resource center is available to help victims of domestic violence by providing the resources needed to complete paperwork in person or remotely. The centers have attorneys available to help those who need services, such as safety planning, temporary housing or shelters, and other forms of assistance as needed, ”said Paula Collins, administrator. from the Law Library Resource Center. “Although lawyers are not court employees, they are available to provide assistance and resources to those seeking protection orders.”

Law Library Resource Center locations:

  • 101 W. Jefferson Street, Phoenix
  • 18380 N. 40th Street, Phoenix
  • 14264 W. Tierra Buena Lane, Surprise
  • 222, avenue E. Javelina, Mesa

You can also access AZPOINT online at https://azpoint.azcourts.gov. On the website, users can:

  • Apply for a protection order
  • Injunction against harassment
  • Injunction against harassment at work

“When a petitioner creates an AZPOINT user account and enters their data, a confirmation number is provided which is used to generate a request for a protection order. The petitioner would then be asked to call the jurisdictional court to schedule a remote hearing. . As a At the end of the hearing, a judicial officer can issue an order which will be served by the police or the gendarme. The service of protection orders by the police or the gendarme is free, ”said Funari.

Funari says there are no fees to file a protection order petition or to file a harassment injunction petition, but a workplace harassment injunction petition costs $ 333.

For more information, visit https://superiorcourt.maricopa.gov/llrc/protective-orders or call the Law Library Resource Center at 602-506-7353. You can also chat with a librarian at http://superiorcourt.maricopa.gov/llrc or by e-mail to services@jbazmc.maricopa.gov.

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International Pronoun Day is October 20 https://thearcmarion.org/international-pronoun-day-is-october-20/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 15:44:16 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/international-pronoun-day-is-october-20/ Campus and community On Wednesday, October 20, the University will once again celebrate International Pronouns Day (IPD), a global initiative created in 2018 that aims to make respect, sharing and education of personal pronouns a common occurrence. Referring to people by the pronouns they themselves determine is a fundamental act of human dignity. Many transgender […]]]>

Campus and community

On Wednesday, October 20, the University will once again celebrate International Pronouns Day (IPD), a global initiative created in 2018 that aims to make respect, sharing and education of personal pronouns a common occurrence.

Referring to people by the pronouns they themselves determine is a fundamental act of human dignity. Many transgender and gender nonconforming people are repeatedly misinterpreted and referred to by incorrect pronouns, which can be an uncomfortable, anxious and humiliating experience.

Here are some ways that members of the University community can learn more about the affirmative use of pronouns and celebrate the multiple and intersecting identities of people within the University community.

  • Visit the LGBTQ Resource Center, located at 132 Schine Student Center. They will be handing out pronoun pins and pronoun ribbons (which can be attached to a badge) throughout the day!
  • Download a Zoom background showing your pronouns and promoting International Pronoun Day from the Preferred Pronouns, Gender and Names Advisory Council (PGPNAC) Pronoun Day website.
  • Update your pronouns in MySlice. Do this:
    • Log in to MySlice.
    • Select the “Personal profile” thumbnail.
    • Click on the “Biographical” tab.
    • Click on the “Pronoun” link.
    • Select your personal pronoun.

For more information on personal pronouns, visit answers.syr.edu / PronounFAQ. If you have specific questions, send an email to pgpnac@syr.edu.


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The Family Advocacy Center brings together resources to help survivors of sexual assault and domestic violence https://thearcmarion.org/the-family-advocacy-center-brings-together-resources-to-help-survivors-of-sexual-assault-and-domestic-violence/ Mon, 18 Oct 2021 04:17:22 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/the-family-advocacy-center-brings-together-resources-to-help-survivors-of-sexual-assault-and-domestic-violence/ Bev McMillan has been the Director of FAC since 2017, hired to help spread awareness of what the center offers to victims of rape and domestic violence. (Roberto E. Rosales / Albuquerque Journal) It’s kind of a dilemma, which Bev McMillan has grappled with since taking over as the manager of the Albuquerque Family Advocacy […]]]>
Bev McMillan has been the Director of FAC since 2017, hired to help spread awareness of what the center offers to victims of rape and domestic violence. (Roberto E. Rosales / Albuquerque Journal)

It’s kind of a dilemma, which Bev McMillan has grappled with since taking over as the manager of the Albuquerque Family Advocacy Center, a place she calls the city’s best-kept secret but one that shouldn’t be. be – and again, it must be.

Hence the dilemma.

The center, which she likes to call the FAC (rhymes with “back”), provides free social, legal and law enforcement services to victims of rape and domestic violence under one roof – a one-stop-shop, if you will, to do so. the grueling next steps after a slightly less complicated, a little more cohesive, a lot more caring assault.

FAC agencies include the Domestic Violence Resource Center, Legal Aid New Mexico, Central New Mexico Rape Crisis Center, Albuquerque Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE), and Para Los Niños. The Albuquerque Police Department, which now includes members of the brand new Community Safety Unit, also has offices in the building but in a separate wing on the same floor.

When it opened in October 2007, the FAC was hailed as an innovative way to combine efforts for victims in need of assistance, law enforcement in need of evidence, and social service agencies in need of hire. a safe place to provide care. Then-mayor Martin Chavez called it “one of the most important things that will be accomplished” during his tenure.

Ten years later, the CAF was called a “beacon of light in a very dark world,” but officials acknowledged that the light was not bright enough to reach as many victims as it should. To that end, McMillan was hired in 2017 to help reignite the FAC.

At the same time, this very dark world has become even darker. To ensure the safety of survivors and families and to protect them from their attackers, the FAC requires layers of security and some anonymity.

“It’s a best kept secret, but in a way it has to be,” McMillan said. But maybe it’s a little too secret, she admits. So I’m here at the FAC to shed light on a space that shouldn’t be a secret to survivors.

The building itself on Silver SW, originally the offices of Mountain States Telephone in the 1950s and later the local offices of US senators in New Mexico, reveals nothing from the outside about its current occupants.

But if you know, you know.

McMillan waits upstairs in the lobby of the FAC, which like most offices is awash in purple tones, the color of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, seen every October. A purple pumpkin sits on the lobby table – McMillan’s own creative contribution. Purple ribbons wrapped in small copper tassels adorn most of the doors of this maze of hallways where the well-appointed agency offices, examination rooms, supply rooms, waiting rooms and game rooms are located. .

To access it, we have to pass a receptionist and a series of security doors. We feel safe here but not confined.

A medical camera in an examination room records evidence of damage to a victim’s body.

The medical examination rooms include baskets of stuffed animals. In one room, the size of the table stirrups, which hold the rape victim’s feet during a pelvic exam, are smaller and covered in fabric decorated with cartoon turtles, a gruesome reminder that some victims of sexual assault are children.

“We had a 2 month old who was sexually assaulted and examined here, and I couldn’t understand what kind of person would do that to a toddler child,” McMillan said.

Para Los Niños, part of the University of New Mexico health care system, provides assessment, treatment, and follow-up care for these children and adolescents. SANE, a nonprofit in its 25th year, also performs forensic assessments and provides support to victims of sexual assault and domestic violence.

Here, an assault victim can speak to a police investigator – if they wish – and then come to the FAC for examination and evidence collection at the same facility, instead of walking between the police station. and the hospital. A shower and new clothes are also available after the end of the exam.

The Albuquerque Family Advocacy Center keeps its downtown location somewhat private. It is only on the second floor of the building that his name is visible, in the welcome mat. (Roberto E. Rosales / Albuquerque Journal)

Down the hall is a room filled with garbage cans of clothes and shoes, sorted and marked by size, gender, and item. Shelves of work clothes are also available for court appearances and job interviews.

Customers can also choose from the multitude of items in the pantry and the assortment of toiletries and diapers.

“We try to anticipate any needs a victim might have,” McMillan said. “We can also help with temporary housing.

Other rooms are reserved for counseling and maintenance, the child-centered rooms are equipped with sandboxes, a whiteboard and toys.

Survivors can get an assortment of food from the FAC pantry. Director Bev McMillan says the most popular item is peanut butter. “For the kids,” she says.

One room has a huge beanbag, where traumatized children can snuggle up to Graham, a friendly black Labrador who is the ODA crisis intervention dog. Another room, nicknamed the Reflection Room, has a working waterfall and reading materials, including the Bible.

Advocates at the Family Violence Resource Center can help victims file restraining orders; Legal aid workers can help with other separation machinations, such as divorce and custody issues.

The FAC exists thanks to the generous support of United Way of Central New Mexico, which pays McMillan’s salary, and local corporate donors. The City of Albuquerque provides free offices to agencies, although each agency maintains its own budget to fund its services.

As we walk through the halls, I am struck by the novelty and the welcome of the place, by the eagerness of the staff of the various agencies to inform the public about the work they do – and by the fact that it there are no clients, at least none. I am able to see. Maybe it’s just a slow morning, as McMillan puts it. I know it’s not because Albuquerque’s sexual assault and domestic violence problem has dramatically diminished.

As we speak, McMillan is responding to emails from iHeartRadio. Billboards are also increasing, she said. Brochures are being printed, some in Spanish. These are just a few of her efforts to raise awareness of the CAF. It is time for this to stop being a secret to those in need.

UpFront is a front page news and opinion column. Contact Joline at 730-2793, jkrueger@abqjournal.com, Facebook or @jolinegkg on Twitter.


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Man arrested after stabbing outside homeless shelter https://thearcmarion.org/man-arrested-after-stabbing-outside-homeless-shelter/ Sat, 16 Oct 2021 23:26:08 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/man-arrested-after-stabbing-outside-homeless-shelter/ SOUTH SALT LAKE, Utah (KUTV) – Police said a man was arrested after being stabbed outside a homeless shelter on Saturday. Lorenzo Bennett, 35, was arrested following the incident outside the Men’s Resource Center at 3380 South 1000 West in South Salt Lake. Upon arriving at the scene, officers said Bennett was found with lacerations […]]]>

Police said a man was arrested after being stabbed outside a homeless shelter on Saturday.

Lorenzo Bennett, 35, was arrested following the incident outside the Men’s Resource Center at 3380 South 1000 West in South Salt Lake.

Upon arriving at the scene, officers said Bennett was found with lacerations to his right hand and was taken to hospital.

Authorities said the second man involved in the incident, later identified as BF, also had forearm lacerations and was taken to hospital.

They said surveillance footage of the tampering between the men showed Bennett grabbing a large knife from BF and “violently swinging the knife at him several times.”

When BF backed up, police said Bennett followed him across the street with the knife where they had a physical confrontation.

BF told officers he confronted Bennett because of the threats he made and also for urinating outside the Men’s Resource Center. The knife was taken from him and swung.

Security at the Men’s Resource Center said earlier that Bennett threatened another male resident of the center, identified as MT.

TOO: Police arrest 2018 suspect who killed woman with knife in Salt Lake City

According to MT, Bennett had blocked the door to the resource center and threatened to stab him if he testified against him in an unrelated case.

Bennett admitted he faced MT earlier that night, but to “apologize to him if he thought he assaulted him in regards to the unrelated matter.”

Bennett was charged with aggravated assault against MT on January 3 in Salt Lake District Court, and police said the case was currently pending.

Officers arrested Bennett for aggravated assault causing grievous bodily harm and retaliation against a witness, victim or informant. He was incarcerated in the Salt Lake County Jail.

Bennett was also jailed in January for yelling at Walmart employees and refusing to comply with police. Another probable cause statement from April said he was sentenced to jail for yelling at an UTA employee at a Trax station and again refusing to comply with officers.


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UVA Health Administers COVID-19 Booster Injections, Third Doses – https://thearcmarion.org/uva-health-administers-covid-19-booster-injections-third-doses/ Fri, 15 Oct 2021 18:03:04 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/uva-health-administers-covid-19-booster-injections-third-doses/ Educational resource center Vaccination clinic Address: 1240 Lee Street (second floor), Charlottesville Vaccination appointment times: Monday: 7 am-11am Wednesday: 3 p.m.-7 p.m. Fridays: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (includes on-site support from UVA allergists between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. for patients concerned about a potential reaction) Car park: Free parking (with validation from the […]]]>

Educational resource center Vaccination clinic

Address: 1240 Lee Street (second floor), Charlottesville

Vaccination appointment times:

  • Monday: 7 am-11am
  • Wednesday: 3 p.m.-7 p.m.
  • Fridays: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (includes on-site support from UVA allergists between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. for patients concerned about a potential reaction)

Car park: Free parking (with validation from the vaccination clinic) is available in the Lee Street Garage and the 11th Street Garage.

UVA Pantops Pharmacy

Address: 590 Peter Jefferson Parkway, Suite 175, Room 172, Charlottesville

Vaccination appointment times: 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday to Wednesday

Car park: Free parking is available in front of the pharmacy entrance.

UVA Medical Park Zion Crossroads

Address: 1015 Spring Creek Parkway, Gordonsville

Vaccination appointment times: 9 am-4pm Monday to Friday

Car park: Free parking is available in front of the pharmacy entrance.

UVA Pharmacy Augusta

Address: 57 Beam Way, Suite 300, Fishersville

Vaccination appointment times: 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday to Friday

Car park: Free parking is available in front of the pharmacy entrance.

Making appointments

Appointments are mandatory and can be made by calling 434.297.4829. Patients with a MyChart UVA account can also register through AVU’s MyChart site. Recipients of the vaccine must confirm that they are eligible to receive a third dose or a booster dose according to CDC guidelines.


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Interest in ‘silver’ jobs declines as older people seek better wages https://thearcmarion.org/interest-in-silver-jobs-declines-as-older-people-seek-better-wages/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 10:07:01 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/interest-in-silver-jobs-declines-as-older-people-seek-better-wages/ The number of older people enrolled in centers that offer jobs for people 60 and over has declined, with retirees opting for higher wages amid a wave of hiring. Less than 700,000 seniors are registered for the first time in 19 years. A growing number of older people are healthy and active, and some refuse […]]]>

The number of older people enrolled in centers that offer jobs for people 60 and over has declined, with retirees opting for higher wages amid a wave of hiring. Less than 700,000 seniors are registered for the first time in 19 years.

A growing number of older people are healthy and active, and some refuse to think of themselves as “money”, a term used to refer to older people in Japan.

Dubbed Silver Human Resource Centers, the sites were created to empower older people and revitalize communities through employment. National and local governments subsidize the operating costs of approximately 1,300 centers nationwide, where staff organize work for the elderly that involves short shifts and light tasks, such as weeding and cleaning. The average monthly salary, usually less than $ 400, is intended to supplement pensions.

According to the National Silver Human Resources Center Association, there were approximately 698,000 members at the end of fiscal 2020, down 17,000 from the previous year.

The silver center model was established in Tokyo in 1975 and became regulated in 1986, which spurred the growth of silver centers nationwide. In fiscal 2009, the membership had exceeded 790,000.

But the numbers have been dropping since companies raised the retirement age for employees and started rehiring retirees. This comes as the government strives to gradually raise the age of public pension payments in the face of aging Japanese society.

In addition, with the spread of COVID-19, more and more seniors have given up work.

In areas where population decline and other factors have resulted in severe labor shortages, some centers have been unable to meet job demands. The centers also face other challenges. Job seekers wishing to work do not always have the experience or skills that match the positions available.

Some centers are attempting to increase membership by asking clients to expand their employment options, to include positions such as kindergarten and senior care assistants, and customer service representatives in local offices. supermarkets.


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Imperial County Considering New Aging and Disability Center ”Holtville Tribune https://thearcmarion.org/imperial-county-considering-new-aging-and-disability-center-holtville-tribune/ Wed, 13 Oct 2021 04:20:29 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/imperial-county-considering-new-aging-and-disability-center-holtville-tribune/ Imperial County may soon see a new Aging and Disability Resource Center if all goes according to plan. The Imperial County Board of Supervisors has authorized the Area Agency on Aging to submit an application to the California Department of Aging to bridge the gap between services for the disabled and the elderly. The center, […]]]>

Imperial County may soon see a new Aging and Disability Resource Center if all goes according to plan.

The Imperial County Board of Supervisors has authorized the Area Agency on Aging to submit an application to the California Department of Aging to bridge the gap between services for the disabled and the elderly.

The center, if approved, would also allow staff to streamline services for consumers and their caregivers, said Sarah Enz, acting public administrator. The center would have to be designated by the State Department of Aging in order to be allowed to proceed.

The center would seek to empower older people and people with disabilities to make informed choices, streamline access to long-term services and support needs while meeting personal goals of a person’s independence, regardless of the source of funding.

Submission of the application has no impact on the general fund, Enz said. The move is in partnership with Access to San Diego Independence.

Sarah Enz, Acting Imperial County Public Administrator, addresses the Imperial County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday, October 12. Enz and the Regional Agency on Aging wants to create a resource center on aging and disability to bridge the gap between services for people with disabilities and older adults. | MARCIE LANDEROS PHOTO

Authorized Domestic Violence Response Team Grant

The county council also authorized the district attorney’s office to submit a grant application to the California Emergency Services Office.

The grant, in the amount of $ 270,857, would be used to strengthen specialized units to provide a coordinated response to victims of domestic violence and their children, District Attorney Gilbert Otero wrote in a letter to council. This response is done through investigations, immediate advocacy for victims and training. The prosecutor’s office established the Domestic Violence Response Team in partnership with the Center for Family Solutions, the Victim / Witness Assistance Program, and the Sure Helpline Rape Crisis Center to provide support services. victim advocacy, crisis intervention and 24 hour referral.

The funds will be available from January 1, 2022 to December 31, 2022.

See also

The program requires a county match, in kind or in cash, in the amount of $ 67,714, which will be met through an in-kind match using DA staff assigned to domestic violence cases.

Honored Farmer of the Year

The county board of directors has also taken steps to pass a resolution honoring the farmer of the year 2021, although one has yet to be publicly named at the October 12 meeting. The Farmer of the Year, named by the Imperial County Farm Bureau at an event on Thursday evening October 14, is a local farmer who is a leader, resilient and constantly strives to improve the industry and his community.

The resolution was not released with the council’s agenda, supposedly to keep the identity of the farmer of the year a secret until it was revealed at the farm bureau event.


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Greenville Rising: week of October 11 https://thearcmarion.org/greenville-rising-week-of-october-11/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 23:42:21 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/greenville-rising-week-of-october-11/ This week we haven’t received a lot of emails or phone calls about anything new about the Greenville rebuilding. Please send us your tips and stories regarding the rebuilding. The Rebuilding Greenville Resource Center needs volunteers to stay open. The center is located in and around the Crescent Hotel (follow the arrows). It is locally […]]]>

This week we haven’t received a lot of emails or phone calls about anything new about the Greenville rebuilding. Please send us your tips and stories regarding the rebuilding.

The Rebuilding Greenville Resource Center needs volunteers to stay open. The center is located in and around the Crescent Hotel (follow the arrows). It is locally managed and operated. The organizer of the center, Lara, made this appeal:

“Local volunteers, we have a regular work schedule but we don’t have enough regular volunteers to fill the shifts. There are a few volunteers who work well on a 40 hour week because they want to keep the doors open for fire survivors. If you could take even one or two shifts each week, it would help give our hard-working volunteers a well-deserved break. Message or text Lara at (907) 242-4426 if you can consistently fill one of these shifts and let her know which days you can work. There are all day shifts (9 a.m. to 5 p.m.), opening shifts (9 a.m. to 2 p.m.), closing shifts (12 p.m. to 5 p.m.) and evening shifts (4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

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The center is also asking that people no longer donate used items, especially clothes, as there is not enough space for them. They go from providing summer clothes to winter clothes and have them available. On its Facebook page, the center posted a “needs list” for items that need it right now.

Non-perishable food, frozen meats, pet food, dairy products are welcome as well as cleaning products (mops, brushes, cleaners of all kinds, laundry detergent, etc.). As it gets colder, everything needed to keep people warm is needed: generators, heaters, gas cans, skidding to wrap pipes, propane, batteries, coolers, steps for senior RVs, storage bins and grab bars for showers.

The center now has internet and laptops for people in Indian Valley who need them, with tabs attached to the desk for frequently used websites such as FEMA, the County website and other recovery websites. The new “computer lab” needs mouse pads. Indian Valley IT expert Julian Wells helped prepare for the tour inside the Crescent Hotel area of ​​the resource center. The center thanked Lulu Paradise, Gabrial Walsh, Denise Piper, Sue Weber and Julian Wells for each of their roles in the making of the computer lab. The center could use “a few computer savvy volunteers” to help people log in and access the websites and recovery forms they need.

Remember, if there is anything you would like to publicize for the Indian Valley rebuilding efforts, please send the articles to [email protected].

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The rest of this week’s column is an editorial. Many of us are in strange living conditions right now because of the Dixie fire. It’s completely exhausting not having your own space to do all of your own things. As I write this I still live in a tiny house on my mom’s property, but doing a cleanup has turned out to be expensive, especially since we’re supposed to be on our own property soon – maybe by November – yeah! But the two friends and family that we had arranged to be able to take a shower etc. fell with COVID, which put our constant insanity into another spin. Where to go… to go? Starting tomorrow, I’ll have a nearly month-long babysitting gig in Quincy that will help me out, but I even recognize that I’m one of the lucky ones who know enough people to acquire temporary space.

It was cold in the little house this morning and I thought of people who might still be camping. It’s not a way of life and the whole process of not having your own place complete with a working kitchen and bathroom keeps a person in a constant state of needing to know what to do next. . There is no room for mistakes or extras.

I have eaten at the restaurant every day for the past two weeks and limit myself to one meal a day and fruit and snacks to make up for it. Eating is expensive. Figuring out where you’re going to eat and what you’re going to eat both to be nutritious and keep costs down and away from people so you don’t catch COVID is a full-time job.

My other full time job that I share with my husband is an extremely detailed insurance claim form that wants to know the brand and serial number of items purchased years ago. Do I keep the receipts? Yes. Where are they? In a burnt down office in downtown Greenville. My mind comes up with all kinds of fantasies for insurance claim matters. They wanted me to list the title and author of 954 books in my office. Thanks to my Amazon account, I was able to produce receipts for 227 of them. But how do you quantify the family Bible annotated with the misspelled musings of your illiterate great-grandfather Ozark? The shoebox in the bottom drawer of a mid-century cabinet with all the letters your Bronx-born Scottish grandmother ever sent you? Or the book on the Mexican Revolution that your Mexican grandparents gave you when you started your graduate studies – the only thing you ever had with their two signatures? Or the first edition of Edna St. Vincent Millay’s book that your mother gave you on your sixteenth birthday is inscribed on you, with the front page inscribed on it of a friend who died long ago, which is her name. registered, etc. ?

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I’m not a cheerleader by nature. I’ve had times this week where I thought I was never going to complete the claim form – somehow I did. If you haven’t finished yours yet, go ahead – you can do it! Goooon Greenville! (I jump for you with invisible pom poms).

People are always asking what they can do to help us, the residents of Greenville; I find it difficult to answer this question in general. For starters, I lost an office and a thousand trees on a property that was under construction but is now months behind what we thought it was. It’s lucky. Most people empathize when I can’t produce my car title, or marriage license, or anything else of societal value that was in the top drawer of my filing cabinet which is now a void. cavernous rusty. But I think what I need most from people – and I bet others do, too – is time to process our new reality a bit more. The initial shock is over; we are no longer on the front page. It is very good. I didn’t like the exploitative nature of people unfamiliar with the area, flaunting their fame on our grave.

But I need time to process all the trauma. I’m not finished. I need to be able to drive from Greenville to Quincy without crying or anger or grief but without going numb at the same time (this morning I swore ancient curses to Caltrans in my head when I saw a perfectly green tree. well felled. Really? You will take up to the last tree which did not burn?). I need some time to decide if my family is going away completely next summer and selling the completed property with the 1000 burnt trees (can’t imagine anyone else wanting this – their main selling point is that it will probably not burn for decades). It may be the Taurus in me: my feet on the ground and stubborn, I will make my decisions at my own pace.

I turn to places like the Greenville Rebuilding Resource Center in Crescent Mills, not because I need anything in particular – I certainly don’t have anywhere to put anything, and my Prius is dangerously close. to look like a clown car – but because it offers the best that humanity has to offer: kindness and empathy and neighbors helping their neighbors. Help them when you have the chance. Meanwhile, I’m going to look at this wall over here and try to take my time wondering where and what I’m going to eat today, at least grateful to know that tomorrow I’ll have a borrowed kitchen to finally redo the meals. . I’ll make a batch of chocolate chip cookies. Then I’m going to do something complicated, nutritious, something that takes a long time.

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Meg Upton plans to bake a huge amount of her special chocolate chip cookies as soon as she has access to her own kitchen again. Photo by Meg Upton


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National Veterans Resource Center to host Living Library event in November https://thearcmarion.org/national-veterans-resource-center-to-host-living-library-event-in-november/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 17:23:55 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/national-veterans-resource-center-to-host-living-library-event-in-november/ Veterans The National Veterans Resource Center (NVRC) will host its first ever living, military-themed library on November 15 from noon to 5 p.m. cultural background, talents and life experiences serving or supporting a person serving in the military. The “Living Books” will share their stories on various topics with “readers” who engage in one-on-one or […]]]>

Veterans

The National Veterans Resource Center (NVRC) will host its first ever living, military-themed library on November 15 from noon to 5 p.m. cultural background, talents and life experiences serving or supporting a person serving in the military. The “Living Books” will share their stories on various topics with “readers” who engage in one-on-one or small group conversations.

Living Library is an annual event encouraging people from different backgrounds to talk to and learn from each other in a safe and supportive environment.

“Syracuse University classrooms and campuses benefit tremendously from the inclusion of military-related students, faculty and staff,” said Ron Novack, Executive Director of the Office of Veterans Affairs . “This year’s military-themed Living Library event is an opportunity to bring together the entire campus community to hear first-hand the experiences, backgrounds and personal stories of our veterans and students. and professors linked to the army. “

The Living Books will share their experience on a variety of topics, including military service, military transition, managing a family while in service, disability, feelings of alienation and ending the war in Afghanistan.

The living library is open to the campus community. Participants can reserve living books in advance for a specific time by filling out the form Registration Form before November 10. If you have difficulty using this form or would like to register as a living book, visit the site NVRC Living Library Landing Page. To request accommodation, please contact us before November 10.


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