Advocacy Resource – The Arc Marion http://thearcmarion.org/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 12:07:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://thearcmarion.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-7.png Advocacy Resource – The Arc Marion http://thearcmarion.org/ 32 32 Brianna Grier: After another mental patient dies in police custody, experts call for widespread training and health resources https://thearcmarion.org/brianna-grier-after-another-mental-patient-dies-in-police-custody-experts-call-for-widespread-training-and-health-resources/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 11:26:00 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/brianna-grier-after-another-mental-patient-dies-in-police-custody-experts-call-for-widespread-training-and-health-resources/ Garrett said Phoenix police shot and killed Michelle Cusseaux in her apartment after threatening officers with a hammer. The police, Garrett said, were not properly trained to respond to someone like Cusseaux, who was schizophrenic. “The police are not mental health or mental illness professionals,” Garrett told CNN. “A schizophrenic, paranoid person, the first thing […]]]>

Garrett said Phoenix police shot and killed Michelle Cusseaux in her apartment after threatening officers with a hammer. The police, Garrett said, were not properly trained to respond to someone like Cusseaux, who was schizophrenic.

“The police are not mental health or mental illness professionals,” Garrett told CNN. “A schizophrenic, paranoid person, the first thing they do when they see an officer in uniform is panic. They resist.”

Garrett successfully lobbied for the city to improve its response to reports of people having mental health crises. In 2017, Phoenix deployed a “mental health squad” made up of officers who receive special training in crisis intervention, negotiation and tactical skills designed to de-escalate situations with people with mental illness.

“They made changes,” Garrett said. “I wanted to prevent this from happening to anyone else.”

While Phoenix police have made changes, across the country people with mental illness continue to die at the hands of police or in police custody.

The family of Brianna Grier, 28, said she had a mental health episode in July when she was arrested in Georgia before falling out of a police cruiser and dying. Investigators have concluded that the rear passenger-side door of the patrol car, near where Grier was seated, was never closed. His funeral is scheduled for Thursday at West Hunter Street Baptist Church in Atlanta. Reverend Al Sharpton will deliver the eulogy.

Experts say deaths like Grier’s underscore a larger issue of whether police are properly trained and equipped to respond to reports of people having mental health crises.

A study conducted by the Treatment Promotion Center found that people with untreated mental illness are 16 times more likely to be killed in a confrontation with police. It also found that people with untreated mental illness were involved in at least 1 in 4 fatal shootings by police.

The risk for black people with mental illness is even higher, experts say.

Call for a national solution

In addition to Phoenix, cities including denver, New York and Chicago have piloted mental health crisis intervention programs. But advocates are calling for a national solution that requires all police to be trained in how to handle mental health crises. Some have also offered partnerships with mental health professionals who can respond around the clock to reports involving people with mental illness.

Johnny Rice, an associate professor of criminal justice at Coppin State University, said he believes in a layered approach to law enforcement.

More than a dozen cities are pushing to minimize or even eliminate police presence on mental health calls

All officers should have mandatory training, and community mental health counselors should assist them on calls involving mental health episodes, Rice said.

The training should also include lessons on cultural sensitivity, he said. People of color with mental illness often already face trauma and existing community violence that law enforcement should consider when responding.

“The stigma of mental illness cannot be something that influences the response,” Rice said. “They need to be officers who are sensitive and aware of the issue and who also understand that they have resources and tools that can help them ensure that someone does not harm themselves or others. .”

The risks of police presence

Some mental health advocates say the police shouldn’t even be involved in the response unless the mentally ill person is armed and poses a threat to others.

Earlier this year, a national hotline “988” was deployed to connect callers to crisis prevention services. A 24-hour call center takes calls and dispatches teams to respond to suicidal crises or mental health-related distress.

Lauren Bonds, legal director of the National Police Accountability Project, said the police are not trained mental health professionals and their presence during a mental health crisis poses a high risk because they are armed.

Bonds noted that police are trained to respond to perceived violence or erratic behavior using force. She said “co-responder” programs where police and mental health professionals show up together have also not been successful: Officers still take control of the response, leaving the risk of violence policewoman.

“I think the best response is to have a purely civilian crisis response team that families can call into these situations,” Bonds said. “They always have the option of calling the police after they assess the situation. But I think keeping the police away, at least for the initial assessment, and giving families the opportunity to know they can getting help for their loved one without the possibility of a police officer killing a loved one is really important.”

Daniel Prude's brother said he was acting erratically and suicidal before his deadly interaction with police

In Grier’s case, her family said she had a history of mental health episodes and they called the police multiple times. His father, Marvin Grier, said police usually called an ambulance service to transport Grier to the hospital for help. But on July 15, Hancock County sheriff’s deputies came alone, handcuffed Grier and placed her in the back of the patrol car to take her into custody for allegedly resisting arrest.

In addition to the door not being locked, family attorney Ben Crump alleges police failed to secure Grier with a seatbelt while she was handcuffed in the back of the car. police.

“If we knew what we know now, we wouldn’t have called them (the police),” Marvin Grier told CNN. “We were dealing with what was happening with her alone and she would have been here. It’s a bad situation that our daughter left here in good shape and ended up (dead).”

There are also striking racial disparities with police encounters.

According to the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, black people are three times more likely to be killed by police than white people. Some research suggests that the the risk of death increases for blacks who show signs of mental illness.

West Resendes, an ACLU staff attorney, said the stigma surrounding mental illness makes black communities — which suffer from over-surveillance and higher incarceration rates — even more vulnerable.

“When we add to that the intersectional layer of mental health disability, it exponentially increases the likelihood of that person having adverse contact with law enforcement,” Resendes said.

The need for better systems

Law enforcement experts agree that police officers are not properly trained to deal with people with mental disorders.

Diane Goldstein, a retired lieutenant with the Redono Beach Police Department in California, said police should be the last agency to respond to a mental health call unless weapons are involved and lives are at stake. in danger.

There is a new approach to police response to mental health emergencies.  get the police out of this

When the police respond and the situation escalates, it’s possible someone will be hurt, she said. But people keep calling the police because in most cases there is no alternative, Goldstein said.

There hasn’t been enough investment in infrastructure to ensure there are mental health workers available around the clock and enough beds in psychiatric units to accommodate people, Goldstein said.

She called on lawmakers to budget more money for community health and safety.

“We can’t build systems without investing heavily in mental health infrastructure,” Goldstein said. “We don’t have systems and it’s not law enforcement’s fault.”

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Views of Montclair – Newsroom https://thearcmarion.org/views-of-montclair-newsroom/ Tue, 09 Aug 2022 19:53:02 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/views-of-montclair-newsroom/ August 9, 2022 High School Students Participate in Summer Pre-College Access Institute Posted in: Home Page News, University Miguel Angulo of Check Point Software Technologies takes a selfie with PCAI attendees at a networking event. The topic on the student’s agenda is “Stand Up for Yourself” and Jane Sanchez Swain interviews high school students about […]]]>

August 9, 2022

High School Students Participate in Summer Pre-College Access Institute

Posted in: Home Page News, University

Miguel Angulo of Check Point Software Technologies takes a selfie with PCAI attendees at a networking event.

The topic on the student’s agenda is “Stand Up for Yourself” and Jane Sanchez Swain interviews high school students about what happens once they enroll in college. Swain, assistant director of graduation programs at Montclair University College, pushes them when they reply that they are more independent.

Someone replies that they are becoming adults. This is the answer Swain was looking for. “Legally, you become an adult,” she says. “So in high school, because you’re a minor, your parents have to take care of things that concern you as a student, your file, all that… In college, as soon as you become an adult, there is something something called FERPA [Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act]. We cannot release information to your parents because you are an adult.

Swain addresses a group of 34 students on campus in late July for the Walmart-sponsored Pre-College Access Institute (PCAI). Now in its second year, the program offers prospective Montclair students from underserved and underrepresented communities the opportunity to learn more about applying and transitioning to college. It also prepares them for academic success.

One of many summer programs offered by Montclair State to facilitate college access, PCAI is modeled after the six-year Hispanic Student College Institute (HSCI) and allows students to live on campus. for three days and two nights. PCAI participants cover a lot of ground, including sessions on financial aid literacy and college essay writing. They also receive mentorship from Montclair students, many of whom are also former HSCI or PCAI participants, and will later be able to network with faculty and staff at the University. But before that, however, peer mentors including Macarena Duque, a psychology major, and Shantal Proano, a medical humanities major, walk them through how to network properly, which covers everything from introductions to handshakes and Dress.

large group photo of all PCAI participants
High school juniors and seniors participated in the Pre-College Access Institute, one of Montclair’s summer programs that helps prepare students from underserved communities for college success.

The conversation in adulthood is the perfect transition into a discussion of the importance of self-advocacy, which Swain also asks PCAI participants about. “College is where you really assert your independence,” she says. “Our goal for you is – and your goal for yourself should be – success and independence.”

She guides them through a series of exercises. Working in small groups, students are presented with different scenarios and must practice defending themselves using a five-step strategy that Swain reviewed with them. She also notes some of the benefits of self-advocacy, including strengthening communication skills, building confidence, and learning to listen better, all of which will benefit them in their academic and professional careers.

“There is power in believing in yourself and there is power in speaking for yourself,” she says.

Jane Sanchez Swain speaking with a student
Associate Director of Graduation Programs Jane Sanchez Swain, right, speaks with a student at a networking event.

Swain also talks to them about the importance of seeking help with mental health issues. “When you are sick, you go to the doctor. When you don’t feel good mentally, it’s kind of the same thing,” Swain says. “Mental health is part of your overall health. Some people may say, “The therapy isn’t working for me. OK, well, how else do you do it? As long as you find a way to deal with how you feel, that’s a good thing. Whatever you’re feeling, you need to feel good, don’t you? »

Swain reminds them that they are never alone and should take advantage of University resources and practice self-advocacy.

“You might not always get what you want, but it’s always worth it,” she says. “You win or you learn something because you never lose when you bet on yourself.”

Samantha, Jaylen and Daniel
Samantha, Jaylen and Daniel attended the Pre-College Access Institute in Montclair this summer.

Among the students betting on their college future is Daniel, a rising senior from Jersey City. Daniel, who wants to study finance and is considering Montclair, attended the HSCI in mid-July. He admits his parents influenced his decision to attend both HSCI and PCAI, but he is glad he did. “Honestly, I love the college life experience, sleeping, having a roommate,” he says, adding that he gathered more information about financial aid during the PCAI experience. . “It’s exciting. It’s good to know more about essay prompts, financial aid. It prepares you well.

Jaylen heard about HSCI on the news, but was unable to attend. So he decided to participate in PCAI. The rising senior from Jersey City says he found the motivational speakers and financial aid presentations especially helpful. “I love the connections they made with the audience. They entertained the audience and kept me engaged,” says Jaylen, who has an interest in studying business and possibly real estate. He says that Montclair is one of his top five schools. “I just want to come here.”

Samantha has participated in PCAI twice, last year and last month. “It’s fun, that’s why I came back,” she said, adding, “Even though you’ve done it before, it’s new because there are new people, you’re in a new type environment now you have new mentors and new speakers.”

The rising Hillside elder, who wants to study exercise science, says she found the FAFSA information presented by Financial Aid Office counselor Nicole DeZerga particularly helpful. She also enjoyed presentations from sorority and fraternity members, new for students this year.

All three students agreed that seeing diversity among current Montclair students was also important to them when evaluating college choices.

“You wouldn’t say, ‘Oh, I don’t feel like I belong here’, but subconsciously you remember that there’s ‘no one here I can relate to’ “says Samantha. “So when you’re around people who look like you and don’t, there’s a balance that makes you feel comfortable. You know you’re not the only one thinking outside the box.

Photo gallery

Tim White
Director of International Academic Initiatives Tim White visits students at a networking event.
Richard Steiner-Otoo speaking on a podium on stage
Government Association President Richard Steiner-Otoo addresses PCAI participants.
group of four students speaking with a Montclair faculty member
PCAI participants network with Montclair faculty and staff during their three days on campus.
Katia Paz Goldfarb
Associate Vice President for Hispanic Initiatives and International Programs Katia Paz Goldfarb, whose office organizes the Pre-College Access Institute, speaks to students at a networking event.
Madeleine Morrow speaking with a PCAI participant
Madeleine Morrow of the Feliciano School of Business Department of Management speaks with a student at a PCAI college fair.
Professor Jonas Zhang talks to students around a table
Feliciano School of Business marketing professor Jonas Zhang visits students at a PCAI networking event.
Olga
PCAI participant Olga networks at a PCAI event held on campus in late July.
group of students walking on camups with PCAI backpacks
PCAI students visit the Montclair campus.

Story by writer Sylvia A. Martinez. Photos by college photographer Mike Peters and Shantal Proano.

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Summer programs help students navigate their way to college

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North Carolina Sheriff’s Stocking Schools with AR-15 Rifles https://thearcmarion.org/north-carolina-sheriffs-stocking-schools-with-ar-15-rifles/ Sun, 07 Aug 2022 21:10:11 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/north-carolina-sheriffs-stocking-schools-with-ar-15-rifles/ MARSHALL, North Carolina (AP) — When schools in a North Carolina county reopen later this month, new safety measures will include stockpiling AR-15 rifles for school resource officers to use in active shooter case. Spurred on by the elementary school shooting in Uvalde, Texas, that killed 19 children and two teachers in May, school officials […]]]>

MARSHALL, North Carolina (AP) — When schools in a North Carolina county reopen later this month, new safety measures will include stockpiling AR-15 rifles for school resource officers to use in active shooter case.

Spurred on by the elementary school shooting in Uvalde, Texas, that killed 19 children and two teachers in May, school officials and Madison County Sheriff Buddy Harwood placed one semi-automatic rifles in each of the county’s six schools. Each of the weapons will be locked in a safe, Harwood said.

The North Carolina school district and the sheriff’s office are working together to step up security after the Uvalde shooting revealed systemic failures and ‘extremely poor decision-making’, resulting in more than an hour of chaos before the shooter was ultimately confronted and killed by law enforcement, according to a report by a Texas House of Representatives investigative committee.

“These officers were in that building for so long, and this suspect was able to infiltrate that building and injure and kill so many children,” Harwood told the Asheville Citizen Times. “I just want to make sure my deputies are prepared in case that happens.”

The idea of ​​having AR-15s in schools doesn’t sit well with Dorothy Espelage, a UNC Chapel Hill professor in the School of Education who has conducted decades of school safety studies and research and student well-being.

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Calloway and Marshall get a new defender of the law from Casey | Local News https://thearcmarion.org/calloway-and-marshall-get-a-new-defender-of-the-law-from-casey-local-news/ Thu, 04 Aug 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/calloway-and-marshall-get-a-new-defender-of-the-law-from-casey-local-news/ MURRAY –The Community Corrections Board (CCB) announced Wednesday that, through a partnership with the Kentucky Agency for Substance Abuse Policy (ASAP), has hired a Casey Law attorney. Shannon Davis Roberts will serve as Casey’s first law attorney for the 42nd Judicial Circuit, which covers both Calloway and Marshall counties. The Casey Law, which is named […]]]>

MURRAY –The Community Corrections Board (CCB) announced Wednesday that, through a partnership with the Kentucky Agency for Substance Abuse Policy (ASAP), has hired a Casey Law attorney. Shannon Davis Roberts will serve as Casey’s first law attorney for the 42nd Judicial Circuit, which covers both Calloway and Marshall counties.

The Casey Law, which is named after a young man who died of an overdose after his parents were unable to intervene on his behalf and get him into treatment, allows family members or Friends of a person with substance abuse disorder to ask the court to intervene in the form of court-ordered substance abuse treatment.

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Sulfur Springs has a young history defender https://thearcmarion.org/sulfur-springs-has-a-young-history-defender/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 13:10:16 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/sulfur-springs-has-a-young-history-defender/ SULFUR SPRINGS — Resident Joseph Cowan, 21, is excited about his hometown of Sulfur Springs and delving deep into his town’s history, making discoveries long forgotten. He posts his findings on the Facebook page, “Historic Sulfur Springs AR”, and has over 1,000 followers. The purpose of the page? “Trying to put Sulfur (Springs) back on […]]]>

SULFUR SPRINGS — Resident Joseph Cowan, 21, is excited about his hometown of Sulfur Springs and delving deep into his town’s history, making discoveries long forgotten.

He posts his findings on the Facebook page, “Historic Sulfur Springs AR”, and has over 1,000 followers. The purpose of the page? “Trying to put Sulfur (Springs) back on the map…and bring the whole community together again.”

Cowan is the administrator of the Facebook page. Initially, it was his own curiosity that fueled his research, but it was the unique qualities of Sulfur Springs that drove him to create the page.

On his page, he publishes various documents on the history of the city. His posts contain vintage photographs and handwritten letters from locals from years ago. Page followers swap stories

and recount their own experiences with the city. Many stories resemble Cowan’s own experience. His interests in the city began at an early age.

“I looked out the window every day growing up, seeing this giant building and wondering what it was,” Cowan said. “It had to be something big and important.”

The building Cowan is referring to is the Kihlberg Hotel.

According to the CALS Encyclopedia of Arkansas website: “The Kihlberg Hotel was built with an upper-class clientele in mind…The hotel was built of native limestone and had five stories, with 100 rooms.”

Over the years, the building had changed from a hotel to a school, then to a military academy. The building towered over the city until January 1940, when it caught fire and burned down. Now only the first two floors remain.

“That’s what started it. It was that building just sitting there,” Cowan said. “A gigantic mystery every day.”

Since December 2020, Cowan has consistently released new content about the city, although it hasn’t always been easy. You have to “dig deep” to find what you are looking for. His research process includes searching the web, visiting the Sulfur Springs Museum, and researching longtime residents.

“I was going to talk to other people who lived in Sulfur Springs in the 50s, 60s and 70s and I was like, ‘What do you know about this building or…what are your memories?'”

Residents show him “artifacts” like family photos or other keepsakes to give him an idea of ​​what life was like back then. Cowan also connects with other researchers through Facebook where they collaborate on all the research they have done on the city.

Sometimes a project will take him down another path. While researching for a story at the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) cemetery, he came across the tombstone of an important figure.

“I was walking around the cemetery prepping photos and stuff for the Sulfur Springs page and I came across this little headstone that said ‘CHH’ and I knew straight away it was Charles Hibernate.”

Charles H. Hibler was the founder of Sulfur Springs.

According to his obituary on Arkansasgravestones.org, in 1885 CH Hibler “purchased the land on which the park, springs, and town of Sulfur Springs now stand.” Among his many accomplishments are building and managing the Park Springs Hotel and serving as Vice President of the Bank of Sulfur Springs. He also used his own resources to have the Kansas City Southern Railway Company run the railroad through Sulfur Springs.

Cowan took a moment to reflect on the work Charles H. Hibler has done for the city and hopes that one day the city will erect a memorial in his honor, even if it is “just a granite scourge. “.

He is proud of Sulfur Springs and will continue to post new content on the “Historic Sulfur Springs AR” page. He likes to see the active community and respond to their posts, even if they disagree on some things. It still surprises him today that the page took off and had so much support. He says all the energy and effort he puts into the Facebook page comes from “a strong connection to this city and (he) will never let go of that connection.”


Special for the Eagle Observer/DANIEL BEREZNICKI This is the iconic building where the Hotel Kihlberg once stood. A fire in 1940 burned down the building, which was then a military academy, and today only two of the five floors remain.



Photo

Special for the Eagle Observer/JOSEPH COWAN A headstone in GAR Cemetery marks the grave of Charles H. Hibler, the founder of Sulfur Springs.


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UC Berkeley can move forward with $312 million People’s Park housing plan, judge says https://thearcmarion.org/uc-berkeley-can-move-forward-with-312-million-peoples-park-housing-plan-judge-says/ Sat, 30 Jul 2022 02:37:30 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/uc-berkeley-can-move-forward-with-312-million-peoples-park-housing-plan-judge-says/ An Alameda County Superior Court judge said in an interim ruling Friday that UC Berkeley may move forward with its controversial plan to build housing at People’s Park. The university cannot break ground until the decision is final next week, when the judge issues a written order. The decision comes after local groups sued the […]]]>

An Alameda County Superior Court judge said in an interim ruling Friday that UC Berkeley may move forward with its controversial plan to build housing at People’s Park.

The university cannot break ground until the decision is final next week, when the judge issues a written order.

The decision comes after local groups sued the university, challenging its long-term development plan, which calls for housing to be built for 11,730 students by 2037.

The groups behind the lawsuit — Make UC a Good Neighbor, the People’s Park Historic District Advocacy Group, Berkeley Citizens for a Better Plan and UC’s largest labor employer — argued that the plan’s environmental analysis term was inadequate and that the university did not take historical resources, such as People’s Park, into account.

The judge said the environmental analysis of individual projects associated with the long-term development plan is valid and does not violate environmental law.

“We are delighted with this latest development and look forward to it becoming official and also look forward to beginning construction this summer,” said UC spokesman Dan Mogulof.

The issue is an important part of the university’s plans to help house its students, who continue to suffer from a lack of affordable housing in the area, with some struggling with homelessness. The long-term development plan includes two housing projects: the Anchor House project which would house 772 transfer students and the controversial People’s Park project to build student accommodation for more than 1,100 students and 125 formerly homeless people.

Additionally, opponents argued in court that the university’s long-term development failed to properly analyze neighborhood and traffic impacts, as well as wildlife concerns. They also said the noise from students coming and going and the party could impact the neighborhood.

Earlier this month, an appeals court temporarily barred the university from starting construction at People’s Park. The university was forced to delay construction, demolition and clearing of the 2.8-acre site.

In September, UC Berkeley approved a $312 million plan to build the People’s Park project, which is expected to begin construction this summer before a lawsuit delays groundbreaking.

Opponents also argue that the university has other properties where it could build housing and that building People’s Park would destroy its history and legacy.

One of their lawyers suggested that the university consider other properties, in Albany, Richmond or Oakland, to build undergraduate housing.

But the judge criticized this suggestion.

“It’s totally unreasonable,” he said.

Harvey Smith of the People’s Park Historic District Advocacy Group said after the hearing that his group would absolutely appeal the decision and also seek a stay in the appeals court to ban the university from innovating.

Smith said the central argument is that UC has alternatives. The group urges UC Berkeley to use a nearby parking structure to build the project instead of People’s Park.

“Why would anyone want to keep a parking structure and at the same time destroy a park in the midst of extreme climate change? ” he said.

The site has a long and controversial history of locals and students opposing housing there. In 1969, the land became a battleground after UC Berkeley tried to move forward with a plan to build dormitories there. The militants fought the plan and eventually won, but their fight ended in bloodshed.

A county sheriff’s deputy shot and killed a man during a protest, then the governor. Ronald Reagan brought in the army to occupy the area.

In recent years, the park has become a shelter for the homeless. But in March, the city and the university teamed up and offered homeless residents temporary accommodation at a city motel.

About 55 people living in the park were lucky enough to move into the Rodeway Inn on University Avenue in North Berkeley. Most residents have accepted the shelter and can stay there for a year and a half, the university said.

On Friday afternoon, people gathered in the park reacted to the decision.

“My heart is broken,” Jennifer Knight said through tears and the sound of angry heavy metal music, as part of De-Fence Phest, a four-day music festival held in the park.

Andrea Pritchett, a member of the People’s Park Council, said it was a place where homeless people could find solace and wait for the decision and groundbreaking to be “waiting for public execution”.

“We’re about to take a stake in the heart of the hub of the most cohesive place of support there is in this city,” Pritchett said.

Tom Lippe, an attorney who represented Make UC A Good Neighbor and the People’s Park Historic District Advocacy Group, said after the hearing that they “didn’t know the basis” for the judge’s interim ruling. If the judge does not give reasons for his decision in his order, his clients intend to appeal.

“If it provides grounds, we will assess whether to appeal after reviewing that,” he said.

Sarah Ravani (she/her) and Emma Talley are editors of the San Francisco Chronicle. Email: sravani@sfchronicle.com

emma.talley@sfchronicle.comTwitter: @SarRavani @EmmaT332

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AARP Announces 2023 Purpose Award Winners https://thearcmarion.org/aarp-announces-2023-purpose-award-winners/ Thu, 28 Jul 2022 13:36:27 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/aarp-announces-2023-purpose-award-winners/ PHOTOS BY (LEFT TO RIGHT): PHILLIP CHEUNG, JARED SOARES, KEVIN J. MIYASAKI, DIANA KING, ARTURO OLMOS. 2023 Winners (LEFT TO RIGHT): Bill Toone, Imani Woody, Zerqa Abid, Jamesetta Ferguson, Sharron Rush Five people ages 50 and older who are using their knowledge and life experience to solve difficult social problems have been named the 2023 […]]]>




PHOTOS BY (LEFT TO RIGHT): PHILLIP CHEUNG, JARED SOARES, KEVIN J. MIYASAKI, DIANA KING, ARTURO OLMOS.

2023 Winners (LEFT TO RIGHT): Bill Toone, Imani Woody, Zerqa Abid, Jamesetta Ferguson, Sharron Rush

Five people ages 50 and older who are using their knowledge and life experience to solve difficult social problems have been named the 2023 AARP Purpose Award Winners, with 10 Purpose Award Scholars also selected. Winners and scholarship recipients will be honored at an awards ceremony on October 25 in Washington, D.C.

“We celebrate these inspiring individuals who have used their decades of life experience to give back in meaningful ways, to be leaders in their communities, and to create a better future for us all,” said Jo Ann Jenkins, CEO of the AARP.

The five winners will each receive $50,000 for their nonprofits, and the 10 scholarship recipients will each receive $10,000 for their nonprofits. All 15 will also receive one year of support from AARP to help expand the reach of their organizations’ work.

AARP will also honor filmmaker, screenwriter, actor and philanthropist Tyler Perry with an honorary Purpose Prize. In 2006, he founded The Perry Foundation, which is committed to turning tragedy into triumph by cultivating individual potential, supporting communities and reaping lasting change. The foundation has partnered with numerous organizations, focusing on education, health, agriculture, human rights, technology, arts, culture, global sustainability and economic development. Through the foundation, Perry has helped people and charities that help others overcome the kind of obstacles he once faced.

Returning for its second year, the AARP Inspire Award, which provides an additional $10,000 to a Purpose Award winner’s organization based on public vote.

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they must be protected (comment) https://thearcmarion.org/they-must-be-protected-comment/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 00:05:47 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/they-must-be-protected-comment/ Access to ancient cedars for cultural purposes is essential for the Indigenous peoples of Southeast Alaska, both for their heritage and the resilience of their community. Carving and weaving traditions call for straight-grained, slow-growing red and yellow cedars 450+ years old with few branches or flaws. These rare forest giants are called “monumental trees,” and […]]]>
  • Access to ancient cedars for cultural purposes is essential for the Indigenous peoples of Southeast Alaska, both for their heritage and the resilience of their community.
  • Carving and weaving traditions call for straight-grained, slow-growing red and yellow cedars 450+ years old with few branches or flaws. These rare forest giants are called “monumental trees,” and many are contained within the Tongass National Forest.
  • Despite its importance, Tongass continues to be threatened by forest management pressures, climate change and political shifts: over a million hectares of forest have been cleared since it was declared a forest. national.
  • This article is a comment. The opinions expressed are those of the author, not necessarily of Mongabay.

Despite heavy duty rain gear and Xtratuf boots, I was soaked through. But you can’t bank on a sunny day in the world’s largest temperate rainforest – the Tongass National Forest – even in Kée.XKwáan (Kake), considered the sunniest town in Southeast Alaska. I plodded along, grateful for the old cedar and spruce canopy above, doing its best to shield us from the downpour. Five young Alaskan natives with a 6 inch box cedar seedlings (“stecklings”) exuberantly follow, pushing their way through the berry bushes in an attempt to lead the group.

The youths are crew members of an Indigenous stewardship and conservation program called Alaskan Youth Stewards (AYS); this is my third summer as a team leader. Unlike me, raised in the hot, humid summers of Georgia, the crew members grew up in Kake and thrive in the cool, humid conditions of the forest. Ethan, who took the lead, points up a giant cedar snag with the circumference of a poker table. “See!” A scar the width of two hands runs up the trunk of the cedar for about 30 yards, tapering to a point. The youths gaze in collective silence at the culturally modified tree – a cedar whose bark has been harvested for cultural purposes native to Alaska. It may have been one of their ancestors who harvested this strip of cedar bark hundreds of years ago.

Kasaan sculptor Stormy Hamar stands with a partially finished cedar canoe. Image by Bethany Goodrich/Southeast Sustainable Partnership.

Southeast Alaska, known for its jagged snow-capped peaks, salmon-filled waters, and ancient forests, is the original homeland of the Haida, Tsimshian, and Tlingit peoples. For approximately 10,000 years, Alaskan Native tribes have stewarded the waters and lands of what is now the Tongass National Forest, sustainably using forest and ocean resources for their livelihoods, cultural traditions and their art. Cedars and bark, used to create utilitarian and cultural objects including totem poles, canoes, paddles, woven hats and baskets, and badges, are particularly important forest resources. Carving and weaving traditions call for straight-grained, slow-growing red and yellow cedars 450+ years old with few branches or flaws. These rare forest giants are called “monumental trees”.

The use of cedar for cultural purposes is important to Southeast Alaska Natives, both for their heritage and the resilience of their community. Recent research highlights the importance of carving and weaving to Indigenous peoples in Alaska, including the provision of essential cultural ecosystem services – benefits provided by nature that have cultural or spiritual significance. The research emphasizes the undeniable association between cedar carving/weaving and identity, physical and mental health, spirituality and connection to nature for Alaska Natives. Additionally, the Tongass provides essential ecosystem services, including global climate mitigation: it is America’s largest carbon sink, absorbing and storing 44% of all carbon sequestered by US national forests.

Monumental tree.  Image by Bethany Goodrich/Sustainable Southeast Partnership.
Members of the Kasaan Organized Village, the Hydaburg Cooperative Association, local Haida and Tlingit carvers and weavers, and US Forest Service representatives came together in the spring of 2021 for a two-day workshop on Prince of Wales Island to to discuss long-term storage. of cedar for cultural purposes. Image by Bethany Goodrich/Southeast Sustainable Partnership.

Despite its biocultural and environmental importance, Tongass continues to be threatened by pressures from forest management, climate change and political shifts. Federal and public advocacy is essential to safeguard cultural forest resources to support native Alaskan ways of life.

Since the designation of 16.7 million acres of Southeast Alaska as the Tongass National Forest in 1907, logging industries have clearcut more than one million acres of forest, approximately the California state size! This extraction of forest resources resulted in the removal of approximately half of the old trees in the area. Red cedar, being a high value export, is more heavily targeted by domestic and international lumber markets. In addition, current United States Forest Service management practices prioritize young-growth, even-aged forests, a growth strategy that conflicts with the slow-growth requirements of monumental trees.

In addition to logging pressures, the health and prevalence of yellow cedar are highly threatened by climate change. Due to rising global temperatures, the essential winter snowpack to insulate the yellow cedar’s shallow roots has become insufficient, causing roots to freeze and resulting in the mass death of yellow cedar. In 2007, scientists reported more than 70% mature yellow cedars of the Tongass National Forest as dead.

Totem Pole Raising Event at Hydaburg Culture Camp 2015: Crow Pole sculpted by Terry Peele, Jerry Peele, Sonny Peele and Clarence Peele, with assistance from TJ Young. Image by Bethany Goodrich/Southeast Sustainable Partnership.

Finally, since the governance of the Tongass National Forest rests in the hands of the United States federal government, it is subject to political drama and reversal. In October 2019, former US President Trump appealed the Roadless Rule of 2001, an agreement between the Native Tribes of Southeast Alaska and Congress, protecting huge tracts of the Tongass Rainforest from road development and natural resource extraction. Even though President Biden reinstated roadless rule in November 2021, events prove that long-term forest conservation is sensitive to swings in federal government cycles.

Pressures from logging, climate change and political instability are all significant threats to the peoples and environments of Tonga. National and international advocacy is needed for the protection of Alaska’s native culture and global climate resilience. There are a number of actions people can take to support the preservation of Tongas and Alaska Native culture.

First, the public must advocate for the support of the Southeast Alaska Sustainability Strategy, a collaborative effort between U.S. Department of Agriculture agencies and native Alaskan tribes to “help support a diverse economy, improve community resilience, and conserve natural resources.” You can help by contacting your state’s senators and representatives to advocate for the agency’s efforts to conserve Southeast Alaska’s natural resources and native cultures and ways of life.

Monumental tree.  Image by Bethany Goodrich/Sustainable Southeast Partnership.
Marina Anderson, Haida and Tlingit weaver and tribal administrator for the organized village of Kasaan, admires an old cedar tree on Prince of Wales Island. Image by Bethany Goodrich/Southeast Sustainable Partnership.

Second, you can help local efforts supporting Alaska Native cultural revival and biocultural conservation: Southeast community members and collaborations such as the Southeast Sustainable Partnership work to protect monumental trees, perpetuate Alaska’s native culture, and increase access to cedar forest products for future generations. You can expand these efforts by donating to support Alaska Native Stewardship, forest regeneration projects, and youth empowerment programs, including the Alaska Youth Stewardsthe Keex Kwaan Community Forest Partnershipand the Hoonah Indigenous Forest Partnership.

Finally, we all have a responsibility to be conscious consumers. Before buying wood or forest products, research the origins of wood and be aware of the impact that consumer purchases can have on the culture and well-being of the people who live there.

Audrey Clavijo worked and lived in Kake, Alaska for three summers as the Coordinator and Team Leader of Kake AYS. She is currently a master’s student at Colorado State University in the Conservation Leadership program.

Related audio from the Mongabay podcast: Two high-profile guests join this episode to discuss the importance of Indigenous rights to the future of biodiversity conservation, listen here:

Related maintenance: Debbie Ngarewa-Packer, New Zealand parliamentarian and Maori activist, explains why it is essential to protect the deep sea from mining, what ancient teachings say about ocean protection and why she is optimistic about the ‘coming :

“The Sea Means Everything”: Q&A with Deep Sea Mining Opponent Debbie Ngarewa-Packer

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Murkowski and Sullivan argue for quick approval of major Arctic oil project https://thearcmarion.org/murkowski-and-sullivan-argue-for-quick-approval-of-major-arctic-oil-project/ Sun, 24 Jul 2022 18:01:18 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/murkowski-and-sullivan-argue-for-quick-approval-of-major-arctic-oil-project/ An ice bridge crosses the Colville River, connecting the Alpine Field to the Kuparuk Field on Alaska’s North Slope Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. Alpine is connected to existing oil development infrastructure only by seasonal ice roads and by air. (Loren Holmes/DNA) WASHINGTON – The senses. Americans Lisa Murkowski and Dan Sullivan call on President Joe […]]]>

WASHINGTON – The senses. Americans Lisa Murkowski and Dan Sullivan call on President Joe Biden’s administration to fast forward the Willow oil project in a letter to Interior Secretary Deb Haaland.

Willow is a ConocoPhillips project on the North Slope that could produce more than 180,000 barrels of oil a day and generate billions of dollars in revenue for the state. The Biden administration released a draft supplemental environmental impact statement earlier this month — a stage of the federal approval process. The project could produce 278 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions over 30 years, according to the draft environmental review.

Murkowski and Sullivan’s letter to Haaland said the “timely completion” of the approvals process is important for development to begin during this winter construction season.

The publication of the draft revision opened a 45-day public comment period as the two Republican U.S. senators from Alaska and top North Slope leaders push for the comment period to end as scheduled, some environmental and Indigenous groups are pushing for an extension.

Sullivan said he thinks the administration will end up approving Willow. The senator said Biden assured the congressional delegation that he was in favor of the project.

“The key issue is that they have to stick to that timeline,” Sullivan said in an interview. “These companies that are going to invest billions of dollars, they don’t have forever.”

Rebecca Boys, a spokeswoman for ConocoPhillips, said the company also wants the Biden administration to move forward. “We have spent years planning this project and working with local North Slope communities to solicit feedback,” she said in an email. “Further delay would only postpone the immense benefits of the project.”

The Trump administration approved the project in 2020. But conservation groups sued, and U.S. District Court Judge Sharon Gleason ruled Willow was improperly endorsed. The decision effectively forced the authorization process to restart.

Both Murkowski and Sullivan slammed the White House in speeches on the ground Wednesday for taking other steps slowing oil development in Alaska and then traveling to Saudi Arabia to boost global oil supplies. Sullivan called the approach an “insult” and Murkowski called it a “punch.”

[Oil prices are through the roof. Here’s why job numbers in the Alaska oil patch are not.]

The senators cited support for Willow from the Federation of Alaska Natives and the Association of Alaska Native Villages in their letter to Haaland. Also, Morrie Lemon, Executive Director of the Arctic Slope Iñupiat Community, Harry Brower Jr., Mayor of North Slope Borough, and Rex Rock Sr., President and CEO of Arctic Slope Regional Corp., sent a letter on 21 July to Haaland to oppose requests to extend the comment period.

“A delay is unnecessary, detrimental and contrary to the interests of Alaska Natives who inhabit the North Slope.” said the letter.

However, not everyone agrees with the current schedule.

Environmental and Aboriginal groups sent their own letter in Haaland in June, highlighting conservation and pollution issues. Their letter, signed by 18 groups, including several based in Alaska, called for allowing Willow a legacy-defining decision.

The groups said approving the project would run counter to the Biden administration’s climate goals. Last year, Biden said the United States should strive for a 50-52% decrease in greenhouse gas pollution levels from 2005 by 2030.

“It’s shocking,” said Sierra Club Alaska chapter director Andrea Feniger. “It’s surprising that they believe this project can go forward and they can still achieve these goals, because it’s just not possible.”

Boys with ConocoPhillips said the project is consistent with the administration’s “fundamental principles of environmental and social justice” and that Willow Oil “represents some of the most environmentally and socially responsible barrels that can be developed anywhere. “.

Alaska Wilderness League state director Andy Moderow criticized the time given to the public to comment on the environmental review, saying 45 days was not enough.

“The shortest period required by law is not sufficient to consider impacts on the climate, on people living on the land,” Moderow said.

Mayor Rosemary Ahtuangaruak of Nuiqsut, the village closest to the proposed project, said the comment period does not give the community enough time to review the new environmental review and provide feedback.

“We really want an extension to the comment period,” she said. “It is very difficult to be on the lands and waters bringing together our traditional and cultural resources, when we have the activity of turning to read these big documents related to the modification of our lands and waters.

“Forty-five days is not enough,” she added. “One hundred and twenty days would give us enough time to really go through the document as it is supposed to be done.”

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Bounder County Sheriff’s Office seeks volunteers for victims’ attorneys https://thearcmarion.org/bounder-county-sheriffs-office-seeks-volunteers-for-victims-attorneys/ Sat, 23 Jul 2022 02:47:48 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/bounder-county-sheriffs-office-seeks-volunteers-for-victims-attorneys/ The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office needs volunteers to advocate for victims. A victims’ advocate should be able to nurture and be a support system for people who have suffered trauma, been the victim of a crime, been the victim of a serious accident or other cases related to trauma, according to a press release from […]]]>

The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office needs volunteers to advocate for victims.

A victims’ advocate should be able to nurture and be a support system for people who have suffered trauma, been the victim of a crime, been the victim of a serious accident or other cases related to trauma, according to a press release from the Boulder County Sheriff.

“Ideal volunteers are at least 21 years old, calm, compassionate, emotionally mature and non-judgmental,” the statement read.

Victim advocates are asked to work either weekdays, Monday 6 p.m. to Thursday 6 a.m., or weekend shifts, Friday 6 p.m. to Monday 6 a.m.

Volunteers must “attend 40 hours of training on crisis intervention, grief response, legal procedures, law enforcement and resource information,” according to the statement.

The training takes place on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from September 27 to October 15. Practice sessions on Tuesday and Thursday will take place from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday practice sessions are scheduled from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. The last training session, October 15, could end earlier.

Applications must be submitted by 5 p.m. on August 26. For more information about victim advocacy or to fill out an application, visit https://bit.ly/3aUflR6 or call Kris at 303-441-4737.

“Our victims’ advocates provide direct support and follow-up to victims of crime and tragedy in our communities. It is an essential and much appreciated service. The opportunity for personal reward and growth for the attorney is also rich,” Sheriff Joe Pelle said in the press release.

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