Advocacy Campaign – The Arc Marion http://thearcmarion.org/ Fri, 22 Oct 2021 22:33:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://thearcmarion.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-7.png Advocacy Campaign – The Arc Marion http://thearcmarion.org/ 32 32 Pulliam Social Justice Scholarship Recipients Announced | Castine Patriote https://thearcmarion.org/pulliam-social-justice-scholarship-recipients-announced-castine-patriote/ Fri, 22 Oct 2021 20:54:27 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/pulliam-social-justice-scholarship-recipients-announced-castine-patriote/ The Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Castine announces that eight nonprofits in the 501 (c) (3) area have received a Pulliam grant for 2021, according to a press release. The Pulliam Social Justice Fellowships were created to honor the memory of the late Deborah Pulliam, longtime member of the congregation and benefactor of social justice causes. […]]]>

The Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Castine announces that eight nonprofits in the 501 (c) (3) area have received a Pulliam grant for 2021, according to a press release.

The Pulliam Social Justice Fellowships were created to honor the memory of the late Deborah Pulliam, longtime member of the congregation and benefactor of social justice causes. This year, the congregation is honored to announce grant funding for the following organizations:

Downeast Community Partners for Friendship Cottage, $ 6,000, to provide a meal delivery program for people with disabilities and low income (6,344 meals per year), restricted grocery cards and social support;

Families First Community Center, $ 6,000, to provide a safe home for families, including children;

Maine Coalition to End Domestic Violence, $ 6,000, for the “Find Our Voices” banner and flyer campaign, networking and the new “Get Out — Stay Out” campaign for abused women;

Food and Medicine, $ 5,000, an anti-racism campaign in partnership with Bangor City Council;

Healthy Acadia, $ 5,000, to produce six podcast episodes documenting Maine culture and the stories of people of color and Aboriginal people;

Maine Unitarian Universalist State Action Network, $ 5,000, to hire an administrator to continue work for electoral justice;

Nature Links for Lifelong Learning, $ 2,000, to engage young adults with disabilities around our ocean plastics crisis and impact around the Penobscot Bay area;

Peninsula Free Health Services, $ 5,000, to be a resource for uninsured residents by increasing clinic days and providing a mental health service volunteer.

This year’s grants totaled $ 40,000, open to all local 501 (c) (3) organizations. “These grants are just one of the many ways in which Deborah Pulliam’s generosity is reflected in our community,” said Reverend Margaret Beckman, UUCCof the minister, according to the press release. “We congratulate the winners and are very happy to be able to support them in their missions.

Pulliam grants are awarded annually. Applicants, deadlines and ground rules for the 2022 grant cycle will be posted early next year on uucastine.org.


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20 community groups, service providers and advocacy groups call on New York City’s five district attorneys to act on policy recommendations to decarcerate Rikers Island https://thearcmarion.org/20-community-groups-service-providers-and-advocacy-groups-call-on-new-york-citys-five-district-attorneys-to-act-on-policy-recommendations-to-decarcerate-rikers-island/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 16:21:20 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/20-community-groups-service-providers-and-advocacy-groups-call-on-new-york-citys-five-district-attorneys-to-act-on-policy-recommendations-to-decarcerate-rikers-island/ New York, NY — Today, a coalition of 20 community and advocacy groups, including Vera Action, the independent 501 (c) (4) of the Vera Institute of Justice and Color of Change, called public to the five New York attorneys. in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens and Staten Island to take immediate action to decarcerate Rikers […]]]>

New York, NY — Today, a coalition of 20 community and advocacy groups, including Vera Action, the independent 501 (c) (4) of the Vera Institute of Justice and Color of Change, called public to the five New York attorneys. in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens and Staten Island to take immediate action to decarcerate Rikers Island. These district attorneys wield tremendous power over who is incarcerated and who is not, but they have not stepped up to deal with this time of extreme crisis. In addition to public calls to action, the coalition is planning a targeted digital and audiovisual advertising campaign to highlight the urgency of this issue.

Unlike the start of the pandemic when, under public pressure, district attorneys consented to the release of 1,500 people from prison to quell the spread of COVID-19 behind bars, they have currently chosen not to act. This coalition knows that time is running out. Fourteen people have died in the city’s prisons in the past year, including Victor Mercado, 64, on Friday, and Anthony Scott, 58, on Monday. The inaction of district attorneys puts more lives at risk.

The coalition urges district attorneys to safely reduce the population on Rikers Island by adopting three common sense measures: release all inmates facing low-level, non-violent charges; draw on the city’s extensive network of community service providers and alternatives to incarceration to individually review and consider release for everyone else; and no longer ask for bail amounts beyond what New Yorkers can afford.

These recommendations take into account public safety, as well as the security crisis behind bars. If the coalition’s recommendations were implemented by the five district attorneys, the prison population would decline by at least 2,000 almost immediately.

The current conditions at Rikers Island lead to the conclusion that decarceration is the only effective immediate solution. The prison population has increased by 47% since the spring of 2020, despite the fact that COVID-19 still rages behind bars today at an infection rate five times the community average. Almost one in six people on Rikers Island has been in pre-trial detention for more than 600 days. The death rate in custody has skyrocketed, with more suicides in 2021 than in the past five years combined. Even though the Department of Corrections has 8,400 officers on the payroll, Rikers Island’s hallways are strangely empty, as nearly a third of staff are on leave or simply don’t show up for work. There is horrific documentation of the circumstances in which incarcerated people are forced to survive, back-up toilets spewing out sewage, missed court dates because there are no prison staff to escort people from the complex prison until their hearings, and failure to provide even the most basic services such as meals, medical care and mental health care. This crisis does not affect all New Yorkers in the same way: almost 90% of the people of Rikers Island are black or Latinx.

“My Day One Memo reflects my commitment to keeping New Yorkers safe. This security extends to people behind bars. We cannot remain spectators of the humanitarian crisis unfolding on Rikers Island. We can both take people out of jail and put them to safety and protect public safety in our communities. As a District Attorney, my policy of presumptive non-incarceration in most cases will lead to the kind of safe and effective release we need to deal with the crisis in our city’s prisons, ”the candidate said. Democrat to Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg.

Concerns that the Rikers Island decarceration will jeopardize public safety are erroneous and unfounded and run counter to due process and the presumption of innocence. Just last year, to curb the spread of COVID-19, New York City quickly and safely released 1,500 people from jail, saving lives behind bars and also protecting public safety. In April 2020, the prison population had fallen to a historic low of 3,800 people. Studies from this period have shown that decarceration did not lead to an increase in crime. On the contrary, the housing, treatment, counseling, jobs and financial support that the city’s service providers have provided to people leaving Rikers Island have improved the health and safety of our communities and no doubt saved lives. lives in the face of COVID-19.

Actions taken to date by district attorneys have had little impact on the overall prison population since the crisis began more than a month ago. This coalition urges district attorneys to adopt the above three common sense measures to decarcerate Rikers Island.

“We can’t wait for another death before our city’s top law enforcement officials take action. Many of our organizations have privately and publicly urged prosecutors Clark, Gonzalez, Katz, McMahon and Vance to do more to address the crisis on Rikers Island. Today, we publicly call on them to, at a minimum, adopt the following recommendations, ”the coalition wrote in the letter.

The signatories of the letter are:

CASE

College and community scholarship

Change color

Common justice

New York Corrections Association

Exodus Transition Community

Freedom agenda

Fontaine House

Go out and stay out

Greenburger Center for Social and Criminal Justice

Legal Action Center

A little piece of light

National Action Network NYC Second Chances Committee

Osborne Association

Organizational project for police reform

Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights

Vera Institute of Justice

Women & Justice Project

Women’s Community Justice Association

The value increases

You can find the full text of the letter here.

About Vera Action

Founded in 1961 to advocate for alternatives to bail in New York City, the Vera Institute of Justice is a national organization that partners with affected communities and government leaders for change. We develop fair and anti-racist solutions so that money does not determine freedom; fewer people are in prisons, prisons and migrant detention centers; and everyone is treated with dignity. In early 2021, the Vera Institute of Justice launched an independent but closely aligned 501c (4) – Vera Action – to expand our ability to shape and enact laws and policies that prioritize racial justice, transform the criminal justice system and realize a vision of a safer and more equitable country for all.

About the color of the change

Color Of Change is the nation’s largest online racial justice organization. We help people respond effectively to injustice in the world around us. As a national online force led by 7 million members, we challenge decision-makers in business and government to create a more humane and less hostile world for black people in America. Our campaigns and initiatives are winning changes that matter. By designing strategies powerful enough to fight racism and injustice – in politics and culture, at work and in the economy, in criminal justice and community life, and wherever they exist – we change the rules written and unwritten of the company. We mobilize our members to end practices and systems that unfairly hold black people back and advocate for solutions that move us all forward.


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City Council Candidates Present Plans to Support Arts and Culture at Virtual Forum | New https://thearcmarion.org/city-council-candidates-present-plans-to-support-arts-and-culture-at-virtual-forum-new/ Wed, 20 Oct 2021 05:07:38 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/city-council-candidates-present-plans-to-support-arts-and-culture-at-virtual-forum-new/ Thirteen city council candidates spoke about the importance of arts and culture to Cambridge and their plans to support and meet the needs of the arts sector at a virtual forum on Tuesday evening. The forum was hosted by Create the Vote Cambridge, a non-partisan advocacy campaign that aims to “raise awareness and support the […]]]>

Thirteen city council candidates spoke about the importance of arts and culture to Cambridge and their plans to support and meet the needs of the arts sector at a virtual forum on Tuesday evening.

The forum was hosted by Create the Vote Cambridge, a non-partisan advocacy campaign that aims to “raise awareness and support the arts, culture and creative workforce” by engaging with voters and candidates, according to the campaign website.

The arts and culture sector is a major economic driver in Cambridge. It generates nearly $ 175 million and provides more than 6,000 jobs according to a report released in 2017.

Many applicants noted that the arts sector is underfunded despite the important economic role of arts and culture in the city. They also highlighted the detrimental effect of the pandemic on artists, musicians, street performers and other members of the creative workforce.

“The arts are the key to a strong economic recovery,” said Deputy Mayor Alanna M. Mallon. “This sector was woefully underfunded before the pandemic, and we have a tremendous opportunity to reinvest in this critical sector.”

Mallon also argued that sources of investment may come from funding from the American Rescue Plan Act, the city budget, and investments from the private sector and university partners.

Other candidates such as Councilor Patricia M. Nolan ’80 have also requested funding from local universities like Harvard – whose endowment recently reached $ 53.2 billion – to support the arts and culture sector in Cambridge.

“We also need to include universities,” Nolan said. “MIT and Harvard have literally made billions of extra dollars on their endowment. Let us ensure that these are used by the City to further fund the arts.

Candidates like Councilor Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler and challenger Joe McGuirk have highlighted the vital link between affordable housing and the art industry in Cambridge in keeping artists in the city.

“The median cost of a one-bedroom apartment is $ 2,200 per month in Cambridge and the median purchase cost is over $ 800,000, and that has a huge impact on the artists and musicians who come across. charge out of town, ”Sobrinho-Wheeler said. . “We are also losing affordable workspaces for artists.

McGuirk had a similar feeling.

“People who improve our life by making art in the city – they should also have the opportunity to live here,” he said.

Challenger Burhan Azeem said if elected he would focus on the Central Square area as an avenue to expand Cambridge as an arts and culture hub. He added that the pandemic has caused many tenants to abandon Central Square, leaving many vacancies that can be used for arts-related development.

“If Central Square is heading for the next hub that really changes, then we should change it in a much better way and really lives up to this designation as a cultural district,” he said.

First-time nominee Frantz Pierre discussed the importance of supporting Cambridge youth to succeed in the arts.

“I think it’s time we gave the children of Cambridge a real chance to succeed,” he said.

– Editor Sarah Girma can be contacted at sarah.girma@thecrimson.com. Follow her on Twitter @SarahGirma_.

– Editor-in-Chief Jennifer L. Powley can be reached at jennifer.powley@thecrimson.com.



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Lexi Bocuzzi | Why local and state politics are the answer to our political grievances https://thearcmarion.org/lexi-bocuzzi-why-local-and-state-politics-are-the-answer-to-our-political-grievances/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 01:49:28 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/lexi-bocuzzi-why-local-and-state-politics-are-the-answer-to-our-political-grievances/ Lexi’s point of view | The solution to division and inaction is at the bottom of the ballot By Lexi Bocuzzi 2 hours ago Credit: Alana Kelly Those who know me know my love for all that is political. My dorm is decorated in red, white and blue, with an American flag as the wall […]]]>

Credit: Alana Kelly

Those who know me know my love for all that is political. My dorm is decorated in red, white and blue, with an American flag as the wall art. The phrase from the song “Lady Like” by country music artist Ingrid Andress (which can often be heard playing from my bedroom) could have been written about me: “Sometimes I forget not to talk about politics / When I’m in the middle of getting hit on. ”

Growing up, however, I was often told that politics was an arena where my altruistic intentions would be stifled by self-interested people who didn’t care about the voters they represent. Despite constant warnings, my fascination with the US government has proven too strong for me to resist, as evidenced by my foresight in philosophy, politics, and economics.

Last semester I started to lose confidence in my belief that the warnings given to me were wrong. In the wake of the 2020 presidential election and the escalation of national partisanship, my confidence that our country’s politics were an enterprise worth pursuing was rapidly fading. At Penn, I have seen groups personally attacking debaters in a Penn Government and Politics Association debate, heard my friends actively restrict their political views for fear of academic or social repercussions, and even face unsolicited comments on my own articles.

My conclusion ? Politics, at Penn and elsewhere, turned out to be exactly what I had always been told it was: a collection of fruitless arguments between often closed-minded people who had lost sight of their original intentions to ” help their communities. Why should I bother? I remembered this question this summer when I had the fortuitous opportunity to compete in local and national races in Connecticut.

Like many of my peers at Penn, my exposure to politics had been exclusively national. I didn’t know anyone who had ever come to a local or state office. My family away from politics had never even had an election campaign sign, let alone a municipal one. This summer, however, my Twitter feed quickly moved from national news to coverage of the Connecticut State Legislature and Stamford Council of Representatives. The change was refreshing. I have had the privilege of working on campaigns filled with people of integrity with a shared common goal of serving the communities they love. It was inspiring to be surrounded by individuals in the political sphere who were genuinely honest, who worked hard, and who listened to the people they sought votes from – a lost art among national candidates.

In reaching out to my hometown, I was also forced to deal with the general lack of civic engagement and information from my neighbors and, in a way, myself. Family dinners and campfires with friends were filled with discussions about the importance of voting in the State Senate Special Election in the 36th District of Connecticut, a topic that has required persuasion even among those who rushed to the polls in November for the presidential election. As I got more involved in the campaigns, I realized how much I had to learn about the issues in my community, even though I bragged about being “civically educated.” “.

This lack of commitment is also true across the country. On average, only 15 to 27 percent of eligible voters voted in local elections, and the numbers are even worse for young people, with those 65 and over being seven times more likely to vote than those aged 18 to 34. These figures are against a turnout of around 60% in the presidential elections and 40% in the mid-term. We saw similar numbers in our own special election with a 26.7% turnout in the 36th District of Connecticut, a number higher than the 13% turnout in a Senate special election of the state in the neighboring district seen earlier this year.

The lack of local participation in the United States is ironic given our highly federalist structure, as so much power over the day-to-day activities of individual citizens is delegated to state and municipal governments. In addition, state legislatures are significantly more efficient at passing bills than the US Congress (regardless of party distribution). State governments pass about 25% of the legislation presented to them, compared to 4% for Congress.

Due to the nature of matters delegated to local governments, partisanship has less room. The national talking points do not go any further on issues like infrastructure and education where everyone, regardless of socioeconomic status, race or gender, sees the success or failure of the tax money. How quickly you can get a fallen tree out of your way or new computers for your local high school just doesn’t depend on DNC or RNC platforms. Likewise, the recent pandemic has proven the important role of local governments, with mayors across the country dictating closures and masking mandates and governors using emergency powers and controlling vaccine deployment.

By shifting our political focus to where our founding fathers intended – the chambers of our state capitals and town halls – we can help tackle the most important issues that plague our discourse and our elaboration culture. politics. We can help elect people who are more invested in serving their ruling communities than achieving celebrity status. We can move away from unnecessary partisan rhetoric and focus on solving the issues that affect our friends, families and neighbors. In doing so, we will see a change not only in governance, but also within our political communities, like Penn’s.

The sooner we stop attaching ourselves and those with whom we disagree to national, polarizing and political identities and start having real conversations about how to fix our communities, the sooner we will get the effects. that we all want in our policy making. So sign up for an academic-based community service course next semester and, in the spirit of National Voter Education Week, head over to the Penn Leads the Vote website to register and research the candidates on your ballot here. Across the country, local elections are held on November 2; Whether you’re voting here in Philly or voting by mail for a home run, know that your vote will make a difference.

LEXI BOCCUZZI is a sophomore college student studying philosophy, politics, and economics in Stamford, Connecticut. His e-mail is abb628@sas.upenn.edu.


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Candidate Profile – Deborah Wright https://thearcmarion.org/candidate-profile-deborah-wright/ Sun, 17 Oct 2021 16:28:23 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/candidate-profile-deborah-wright/ The Atlantic Highlands Herald has invited each of the candidates for office on the school boards and governing bodies of the Atlantic Highlands, Highlands, Middletown and Sea Bright to respond to a series of questions pertaining to them in order to better inform our readers about their campaigns. . The deadline for submission is Friday, […]]]>

The Atlantic Highlands Herald has invited each of the candidates for office on the school boards and governing bodies of the Atlantic Highlands, Highlands, Middletown and Sea Bright to respond to a series of questions pertaining to them in order to better inform our readers about their campaigns. . The deadline for submission is Friday, October 22. We will post their responses individually and make them available in our Policy section.

CANDIDATE PROFILE

November 2, 2021 – General election

Profile date: October 17, 2021

Candidate Name: Deborah Wright

Age (on election day): 51


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Job sought (term): Re-election to the Middletown Township School Board

Party or banner affiliation: Non-partisan election

Family: I am married to James Marino and we have a nine year old son who is in the fourth grade at Bayview Elementary School.

Education: I graduated from Douglass College, Rutgers University and have a JD from New York Law School.

Occupation: Community action representative for United Auto Workers, compromised region 9A of the northeastern states.

Previous or current office elected or appointed: I was first elected to the Middletown Township Education Council in November 2018.

Campaign website or Facebook page: My Facebook page is on Vote4DeborahWright. I can also be reached at [email protected].

Why are you looking for an office?

It has been a privilege to serve our school district for the past three years. Helping students to facilitate their school career is what motivates me on a daily basis. I will continue to steer the conversation towards the real issues that require our attention. Aging and overcrowded schools, the highest standards for a quality curriculum, monitoring your tax dollars and keeping your children safe while preparing them for their future.

The two most important issues we face (council, district, council, committee, etc.) are continued cuts in our funding for education and aging and overcrowded schools.

I lobbied our lawmakers in Trenton on behalf of our school district, stressing the need to change the current school aid formula under Senate Bill S2, as well as the current formula used to determine the amount. of funding that districts will receive to cover the costs of special education. This year our district received an increase of $ 800,000 in extraordinary special education funding. Once re-elected, I will push for more funding for education in Middletown schools.

I was part of the board’s strategic planning committee which formulated an action plan to begin the strategic planning process with the community. We hired a consultant and demographer, organized eight community forums to listen to community priorities, interviewed the community, evaluated all the data we got with the consultant and demographer, and produced a study with the first set of proposals in December 2020 Then, this year, the new board leadership unilaterally halted progress on this project despite protests from board members and the community. All the while, our schools continue to age, as we just saw at the start of this school year when every school in our district was closed due to mold and students were forced to delay the start of their school year. school year, now having remedial days for the rest of the year. Overcrowding at several schools continues and is expected to worsen due to the two large residential developments that are currently under construction in the city. Upon re-election, I will push to complete the strategic planning process with the community to finally resolve this long-standing issue within Middletown.

Describe the other issues that define your campaign platform.

  • Make it safe for students to learn in person.
  • Advocate to bring Zoom back so that the community has the opportunity to attend meetings virtually and fully engage with the board. I want to do this policy.
  • Continue to be a champion of including our neurodiversified learners in general education and expanding educational opportunities for all students. I will continue to lobby for Wilson, and other multisensory reading platforms, for our growing number of students diagnosed with dyslexia.
  • Push for expanded career and technical alternatives for students so that they can fully prepare for a successful career after graduation.

What accomplishments in your past would you cite as proof that you can handle this job??

For 21 years, I proudly served as a Public Advocate with the Legal Aid Society, specializing in mental health law. For twelve of those years I was elected president of the Association of Legal Aid Attorneys, United Auto Workers Local 2325. Working in a traditionally underfunded and undervalued sector of society has really sharpened my skills in this area. advocacy. Being president of the local has given me valuable experience lobbying for funding and legislation at the federal, state and local levels, as well as testifying before legislative bodies. I have also gained extensive experience in understanding the operating budgets of non-profit organizations and negotiating collective agreements. I was responsible for 1,200 members, spread across various non-profit organizations, in addition to supervising the staff of the local.

What would you like voters to know about yourself and your positions?

I am an active member of Bayview PTA and chair Cub Pack 141 committee.


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KPWKM creates committee to fight cyberbullying and sex crimes against children https://thearcmarion.org/kpwkm-creates-committee-to-fight-cyberbullying-and-sex-crimes-against-children/ Sat, 16 Oct 2021 10:40:00 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/kpwkm-creates-committee-to-fight-cyberbullying-and-sex-crimes-against-children/ PUTRAJAYA: The Ministry of Women, Family and Community Development (KPWKM) has established an integrated action committee to fight cyberbullying and online sex crimes against children. His Minister Datuk Seri Rina Mohd Harun(Photo) said the move is in line with Malaysia’s commitment to protect children from sexual exploitation and abuse based on article 34 of the […]]]>

PUTRAJAYA: The Ministry of Women, Family and Community Development (KPWKM) has established an integrated action committee to fight cyberbullying and online sex crimes against children.

His Minister Datuk Seri Rina Mohd Harun(Photo) said the move is in line with Malaysia’s commitment to protect children from sexual exploitation and abuse based on article 34 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC).

“Malaysia must comply with the principles and provisions enshrined in the CRC, in particular regarding the rights of children, including their survival, protection, development and participation,” she said.

Rina said the committee was established on June 15, comprising various government agencies, the private sector, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and social activists.

The committee is also tasked with discussing advocacy measures and appropriate interventions regarding the issues, she added.

“We (the committee) discussed methods to tackle these issues (cyberbullying and child sex crimes). Among those that will be carried out is an advocacy campaign, ”she said at a press conference after presiding over the celebration of National Children’s Day 2021 on the theme“ Our children, our future ”here today.

In another development, Rina said that the KPWKM is drafting the soon to be introduced National Child Development Index with the aim of improving policies related to the biological and psychological development of children.

She said Malaysia’s Department of Statistics reported that in May of this year, around 9.69 million or 29.3% of Malaysia’s total population were children.

“In view of this huge number, KPWKM, in the minds of the Malaysian family, remains committed to ensuring the welfare of children in the best interests of the child,” she said.

Meanwhile, 11-year-old Hang Tuah award recipient Muhammad Hadif Syazwan Anas expressed his pride at the recognition.

Hadif Syazwan received the award for his courage in saving his great-grandmother Kalsom Abdullah, 85, from flooding in Yan, Kedah on August 18.Bernama


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Sliwa’s colorful run for New York mayor https://thearcmarion.org/sliwas-colorful-run-for-new-york-mayor/ Fri, 15 Oct 2021 05:43:20 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/sliwas-colorful-run-for-new-york-mayor/ NEW YORK (AP) – Wearing his signature red beret, Curtis Sliwa is on TV, stroking one of his 16 rescue cats in a campaign ad. He’s in the metro with his Guardian Angel Crime Patrol. He puts an end to restaurant fights in Little Italy and blames the Mafia and the mayor when he is […]]]>

NEW YORK (AP) – Wearing his signature red beret, Curtis Sliwa is on TV, stroking one of his 16 rescue cats in a campaign ad. He’s in the metro with his Guardian Angel Crime Patrol. He puts an end to restaurant fights in Little Italy and blames the Mafia and the mayor when he is banned from judging the meatball-eating contest.

This is how the Republican candidate embarks on an unlikely quest to become mayor of New York – always wearing his red hat.

Sliwa has spent decades as a stunt-loving New York character, with a knack for keeping press cameras close at hand and a history of bombastic statements. He once survived an attempted mob strike prompted by his radio commentary.

The Republican insists his campaign this year is not a long shot, but rather a slingshot of David and Goliath, with Sliwa as a wise “common man” speaking out about crime and disorder.

“I’m the only Republican who can go to neighborhoods where the only Republican they’ve ever seen is Abraham Lincoln with a $ 5 bill and be well received,” Sliwa told The Associated Press this week in an interview. to her cat filled. apartment.

“I think most people don’t necessarily see me as a Republican. They see me more as a populist. – It’s Curtis. We know him, ”Sliwa said. He says the fact that he won the Republican nomination when he never voted for Trump is a sign he can improbably win against the Democrats.

At a campaign rally later that day, he dismissed the idea that winning was impossible, saying he had “been David against Goliath” his entire life.

Sliwa is widely expected to lose next month’s election to Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, a Democrat and former New York City police captain who is believed to be the city’s second black mayor.

In a city where Democrats outnumber Republicans 7-1, Adams emerged from a crowded primary field as a candidate with a more subdued image, a pro-business approach, and a singular perspective on crime that has mixed his time with the NYPD, his past advocacy calling for reform in the department, and experiences of police brutality as a teenager.

Sliwa, 67, has been a ubiquitous figure in New York City since he founded the anti-crime group Guardian Angels in 1979. The unarmed unit of young men and women dressed in red berets and matching jackets began by patrolling in the city of New York, then plagued by crime. subway system and extended into the city before creating chapters across the United States

The 320 square foot Upper West Side apartment Sliwa shares with his wife Nancy is decorated with numerous campaign posters and images of himself and their many cats. Part of a wall is covered with old newspaper clippings and posters of the early exploits of the Guardian Angels, a sign that read “Crack Down on Crack” and some police sketches of decades-old rape suspects. .

He says the painting is a reminder of the band’s roots in a more gritty New York City.

“His analysis of New York is, in some ways, very archaic and I think a lot of voters see him as a holdover from old New York, with his red beret and I would say a racialized understanding of how the city works, which I do not know. I don’t think many New Yorkers are interested right now, ”said Christina Greer, associate professor of political science at Fordham University.

Sliwa won the Republican primary earlier this year after beating restaurateur Fernando Mateo.

Two decades of Rudy Giuliani and Michael Bloomberg in the mayor’s office prove that Republicans can – or at least once could – overcome the Democrats’ advantage in the city.

But Sliwa’s style and reputation, Greer said, means he’s “not really taken seriously by a certain segment of the population.”

Sliwa’s talent for attention turned deadly serious in 1992 when he was shot after using his radio show to pillory Mafia boss John Gotti. He escaped his alleged assassins by diving out of a car window.

He confessed after the real attack that he had in the past concocted stories about the exploits of guardian angels, including foiling a rape and a fake story about Sliwa’s kidnapping by Transit Authority police.

After making obscene and racist remarks on television and radio about the head of city council, he was briefly excluded from a regular spot on a local television talk show. Sliwa then apologized for his comments.

Last summer, when Democratic Mayor Bill de Blasio banned swimming on city beaches in an attempt to stem the spread of the coronavirus, Sliwa staged a protest on Coney Island, first by pasting a cutout in cardboard of de Blasio’s face on the beach and kicking the sand on it. He then swam for about an hour, in a wetsuit and red beret, ignoring orders from city park officials to get out of the water.

As a candidate for mayor, he has been true to his ways.

Sliwa holds almost daily press conferences throughout the city, often at crime scenes on a day when he denounces the city’s failing leadership. In a shootout not far from his apartment, he lay face down in the street, looking for a “smoking gun” under a car as the television cameras rolled.

His campaign posted videos purporting to show Sliwa and her guardian angels streaming at a restaurant in Little Italy to separate and hold unruly customers.

Sliwa dismisses Adams as being out of touch and away from the streets, and hammered him over for reports he vacationed in Monaco and organized fundraisers in the Hamptons and Martha’s Vineyard. He jumped on reports wondering if Adams really lived in his Brooklyn brownstone, crossing a bridge to Fort Lee, New Jersey, holding a carton of milk with Adams’ face “missing”.

Adams, meanwhile, largely ignored Sliwa.

“It’s a challenge for me to strike up a conversation with someone who admitted to making up crime stories” and “doing antics every day,” Adams said in a recent radio interview.

“We’re going to have to endure the antics of someone who thinks it’s a circus for four weeks, and I’m going to put up with it because it’s the process,” Adams told WNYC. “But can we take Curtis Sliwa seriously on anything, given his history in this town?” “


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Mission community pool set to close despite campaign https://thearcmarion.org/mission-community-pool-set-to-close-despite-campaign/ Wed, 13 Oct 2021 23:34:16 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/mission-community-pool-set-to-close-despite-campaign/ An unknown Mission swimmer has a bugle call for others taking a dip at the Mission Community Pool at 1 Linda Street: raise your voice, or lose your pool for the winter. The outdoor pool normally closes between late October and March, although the Department of Recreation and Parks has extended the pool schedule until […]]]>

An unknown Mission swimmer has a bugle call for others taking a dip at the Mission Community Pool at 1 Linda Street: raise your voice, or lose your pool for the winter.

The outdoor pool normally closes between late October and March, although the Department of Recreation and Parks has extended the pool schedule until November 27 of this year. Flyers posted around the neighborhood urging pool patrons to share their views on the season continuing through the winter.

“Maybe we can get them to change their mind,” the flyer read. “There is something different and better about swimming outdoors. It’s also less “COVID-y” than swimming indoors. “

However, the call is unlikely to be answered.

“We appreciate everyone’s plea to continue swimming at Mission Pool,” said Tamara Barak Aparton, deputy director of communications and public affairs at the Ministry of Recreation and Parks. While the ministry doesn’t know the exact number of calls it received to keep the pool open all winter, she said staff said this was consistent from year to year.

“A lot of considerations were taken into this decision,” she said. “We analyzed data from the past three years and learned that there was a significant drop in attendance during the winter months.”

“In addition, the shift from our historically seasonal pool to year-round status is not sustainable for our department,” added Aparton. The mission pool is only funded seasonally, she said, and staff there are supported by moving staff from other pools that are open year round. This year’s extension was made possible because one of the renovations to these pools took longer than expected.

The Mission Community Pool was built in 1916 and is the only outdoor pool operated by the City through the Department of Recreation and Parks. In addition to swimming lessons, the pool offers regular swims, swims for seniors, aquagym lessons and family swims.


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It is not the pro-life who ignore the poor, but the leftists who stop charity https://thearcmarion.org/it-is-not-the-pro-life-who-ignore-the-poor-but-the-leftists-who-stop-charity/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 11:20:17 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/it-is-not-the-pro-life-who-ignore-the-poor-but-the-leftists-who-stop-charity/ One of the reality-busting strategies of the pro-abortion lobby is to use compassionate or even Christian-sounding arguments to advocate for abortion and attack those who are pro-life. Proudly Senator Raphael Warnock declared “I am a pro-choice pastor” during his recent campaign. Apparently Catholic President Joe Biden is trying to sidestep his stubborn public rejection of […]]]>

One of the reality-busting strategies of the pro-abortion lobby is to use compassionate or even Christian-sounding arguments to advocate for abortion and attack those who are pro-life. Proudly Senator Raphael Warnock declared “I am a pro-choice pastor” during his recent campaign. Apparently Catholic President Joe Biden is trying to sidestep his stubborn public rejection of the Catholic Church’s teaching on abortion by claiming that he personally supports the Church’s position, but not publicly. (Imagine someone saying they are personally against the murder, but not publicly believing it should be illegal.)

Another way the abortion lobby tries to use the faith of life advocates against them is to accuse Christians of caring more about life in the womb than outside. The argument claims that those who are staunchly pro-life do not value other types of human life, and that their concern for the unborn innocent is nothing more than a ruse to hide their contempt for the poor, the sick, the orphans, the prisoners and others. .

The Facebook post below, which resurfaced recently, is just one example:

Typically, those who make these kinds of ad hominem arguments do not cite actual interactions with pro-life Christians, nor do they cite surveys of Christians or pro-life to objectively determine how many individuals and groups involved in pro-life advocacy are also involved. in the care of other vulnerable groups.

It does not follow logically, of course, that fighting for the lives of innocent unborn babies must involve callousness to the sick, the poor and the vulnerable. It is quite possible to deal with many different types of vulnerable groups at the same time, something in which the large faith community in our country excels on a daily basis.

As a data point, Baylor University published a study in 2017 on the effects of faith-based community efforts on homelessness. It found that in the cities studied, the majority of emergency shelter beds – 58% – were provided by faith-based organizations for the homeless, and that these organizations generated $ 9.42 in savings for the homeless. taxpayers for every $ 1 of government funding.

It’s not just homelessness. Countless faith-based organizations care for inmates, go to prisons to love and listen to inmates and help them cope once released. These programs reach countless thousands of people with the life-giving hope of faith.

Considering that those most engaged in their faith communities are more likely to spend their time and cherish serving the vulnerable, and more likely to be pro-life, the strong and varied faith-based awareness of vulnerable kebabs l argument that pro- people of the faith life despise such efforts.

I suggest a different approach for those who are trying to use Christianity against babies’ right to life. If they sincerely want greater participation of the faith community in the work of helping vulnerable people, let me show them where to start: to fight to eliminate government bureaucracy.

During the Trump administration, I had the honor of serving as Assistant Secretary for Community Planning and Development in the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) under the leadership of Secretary Ben Carson. One of the areas my department was responsible for was roaming.

In this role, I have met dozens of faith groups that deal with every type of vulnerable segment of our society. There is absolutely no shortage of Christians willing to help. These large groups have often presented innovative proposals to house the homeless, care for people with mental illness, strengthen broken families and help forge better relationships between law enforcement and homeless communities.

I quickly learned that the faith community is willing and highly capable of compassionately caring for the homeless, drug addicts, the chronically poor, widows, orphans and others. Unfortunately, I have also witnessed the devastating impact of the way government laws and regulations tie the hands of these large faith-based organizations, often preventing them from participating in or being funded by federal programs. This, rather than attacking the character of those who are pro-life, is the starting point for anyone concerned with increased engagement of faith groups to meet the needs of vulnerable people.

Instead of challenging the motivations and character of pro-life Christians who care deeply about defending innocent unborn babies, why not work with other Americans of all political stripes to remove the bureaucratic red tape that hinders our large groups? faith-based organizations to serve all the most vulnerable in our society more effectively?

John Gibbs (@realJohnGibbs) is a regular contributor to The Federalist and RealClearPolitics. He worked at Apple as an iPhone engineer and used his fluency in Japanese to teach technology to churches in Japan. John holds a BS in Computer Science from Stanford University and an MA in Public Administration from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.



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Mabee Foundation awards $ 600,000 challenge grant to Children’s Advocacy Center | Local News https://thearcmarion.org/mabee-foundation-awards-600000-challenge-grant-to-childrens-advocacy-center-local-news/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 00:32:53 +0000 https://thearcmarion.org/mabee-foundation-awards-600000-challenge-grant-to-childrens-advocacy-center-local-news/ A $ 600,000 challenge grant announced Wednesday is intended to act as a catalyst for the Smith County Children’s Advocacy Center to meet its growing demand for help for abused children. The JE and LE Mabee Foundation awarded the challenge grant, the children’s advocacy center announced during a lunch at the Grove Kitchen & Gardens […]]]>

A $ 600,000 challenge grant announced Wednesday is intended to act as a catalyst for the Smith County Children’s Advocacy Center to meet its growing demand for help for abused children.

The JE and LE Mabee Foundation awarded the challenge grant, the children’s advocacy center announced during a lunch at the Grove Kitchen & Gardens Greenhouse. The grant is to be used for the centre’s fundraising project, which is to purchase and renovate the old TCA cable building at 3015 S SE Loop 323 to house its programs for abused children and their families.

To meet grant requirements, the center must raise remaining $ 578,334 in renovation costs by April 13.

Building renovations will create child-friendly spaces suitable for our specific programs, according to the Children’s Advocacy Center. Planned upgrades include several forensic interview rooms, medical examination space, therapy offices, training rooms, emergency resource supply rooms, and offices for personnel and forces. order.

The 39,000 square foot building offers nearly five times the space of the centre’s current facility, which will accommodate the rapid growth it has experienced over the past four years. In Smith County, forensic interviews and the programs that flow from the initial service increased by 79% during that time.

Smith County Children’s Advocacy Center Deanna Sims, chief development officer, stressed the importance of the grant.

“Each year, one in 56 children in Smith County walk through our door as a reported victim of abuse,” Sims said. “That means 20 new victims of child abuse here in Smith County come to see us every week. And studies show that for every 20 reported victims that reach us, there are another 30 that don’t. We therefore aim to bring hope, healing, safety and justice to every child victim of abuse in Smith County, and to empower our community to recognize, report and prevent abuse in the future. “

Smith County Children’s Advocacy Center Executive Director Terri Smith said she was truly grateful for the efforts of everyone involved.

“If you are in this room and prayed for this building and this trip, then your prayers have been answered to the size of God. We are eternally grateful, ”said Smith.

For more information about the services offered by the Smith County Children’s Advocacy Center, call (903) 533-1880 or visit cacsmithcounty.org.

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